Level (of a second language)

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Does "level" meaning "how good your command of a second language is (as a non-native speaker)" sound natural/correct in the examples that I created below?

a. I'm studying Spanish, but I'm at the basic level. (meaning: I'm still learning the basics)
b. I study Spanish, but my level isn't so good. (meaning: I don't have a good command of the language)

Thank you in advance!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    At the basic level sounds ordinary in the first sentence, Xavier. Your use of level in the second sentence seems strange to me.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you all very much.

    For (b), could I say "My level isn't so high" or maybe "My command isn't so good"?

    b. I study Spanish, but my level isn't so high. (meaning: I don't have a good command of the language)
    b. I study Spanish, but my command isn't so good. (meaning: I don't have a good command of the language)
    Thank you in advance!
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. I would rather see I study Spanish, but my command of the language isn't very good. By itself, my command seems odd.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "Level" makes sense in relation to an educational program or evaluation test. I would use this on campus or in my teaching life.

    I wouldn't use it in the larger world, for instance in regards to my neighbor. Or to describe my own ventures into additional languages.

    I'd be more descriptive. Usually there's a cut off point where either you can get by functionally, or you can't. That's what matters in the larger world where we say we can or can't speak a language.
     
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