lever /lpronunciation/

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Daniel López

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello,

This word usually rhymes with "fever", however some people use it as rhyming with "leather". Altough this second use is also acceptable, I would like to find out if the differences in actual usage are significative and mainly regional E.g. BrE-AmE-Can-Nz-
"Lever, leverage"

Thank you, as ever.
 
  • Daniel López

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you.

    The problem, as usual, is that when English replaced French as a foreing language in the Spanish schools (not so many decades ago) we were taught only the BrE grammar&pronunciation. Now there´s a mixed tendency that is quite confusing to us, and some old die-hards still won´t consider acceptable other usage than the BBC or Queen standard of English.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In all fairness, to the British ear, lever to rhyme with leather, sounds so strange as to cause the thought that it is some other word. It probably would not matter much if the word were used every day - we would get used to it and accept it. Added to this, US English uses the verb "to lever" more often than BE (often figuratively.)
     

    newtowelding

    Senior Member
    Canada-English
    I am from Canada and lever tends to rhyme with fever.

    Lever(noun) rhymes with fever. However, leverage rhymes with leather.
     
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    newtowelding

    Senior Member
    Canada-English
    The more I think about it, in Canada you may hear leverage as in fever. However I would say leverage as in leather and lever as in fever.
    There is quite a mix of influence from both American and British English in Canada and often you hear may hear both pronunciations.

    I hope that isn't confusing things more for you.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    leeverage is what you have when you have a lever under a weight. (literal)
    Lehv'rage is what you have in the commercial world particularly as a verb. (figurative, and an import from AE -> see also #4.)
     
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