leverage (verb)

latenight

Member
Chinese
I don't know of how to use "leverage" as a verb...Could you give me some examples out of your mind to illustrate?...

For example, "How can i leverage a Job offer, if i had it?"...What "leverage" means in this sentence?...

Other useful examples appreciated as well...:)
 
  • recombinant

    New Member
    English - USA
    "Leverage" should probably not really be used as a verb, but it is often used in such a way in English, particularly in business.

    To "Leverage" typically means to use something that makes doing something else easier or more effectively.

    Example:
    I will leverage my knowledge of cooking so I can excel in my job as a chef.
    It can also be used as a noun (which I believe is more proper anyway):
    my knowledge of cooking gives me leverage to do well at my job as a chef.

    -or-

    I will use my knowledge of cooking as leverage in excelling at my job as a chef.

    I hope this helps!

    :D
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "Leverage", as a verb, is usually used in one of two ways:
    A vague buzzword that people think sounds cool
    A precise economic term which means to finance an asset through debt

    This leads to the curious phenomenon in which people say "This company is highly leveraged" thinking that it means something good, when in fact it means "We're up to our eyeballs in debt".
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    This leads to the curious phenomenon in which people say "This company is highly leveraged" thinking that it means something good, when in fact it means "We're up to our eyeballs in debt".

    At the risk of moving from language to commerce, a highly leveraged company may be doing all the right things for future profitability and growth, or it may be behaving recklessly. People outside of the business world are apt to think that 'highly leveraged' is a bad thing. It may be very bad or very good, depending on factors such as market growth rates and presence or absence of strong competitors. Many start-up companies are highly leveraged. Some fail, and some achieve market dominance by growing quickly, using borrowed capital.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    "Leverage" should probably not really be used as a verb, but it is often used in such a way in English, particularly in business.

    I don't know if it "should" be used as a verb, but the verb example you give is absolutely standard for business-speak and the noun examples are not.
     

    moctodal

    New Member
    English
    I don't know if it "should" be used as a verb, but the verb example you give is absolutely standard for business-speak and the noun examples are not.

    Interesting you put "should" in inverted commas but not "business-speak". I think what recombinant meant by "should" is the word used in its original meaning.

    Certain words that could be categorised as "business-speak" seem to replace an acceptable short word with a long one that means something similar or something else. "leverage" and "utilise" are classic examples of a replacement for the word "use". Perhaps business people feel that using a longer word gives them more impact.
     
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