Lies

Edher

Senior Member
USA
Cd. de México, Spanish & English
Saludos,

I just want to make sure if "lies" is really pronounced with a "z" at the end. So is it really "liez." ?

Thanks,
Edher
 
  • Edher

    Senior Member
    USA
    Cd. de México, Spanish & English
    Hola SuZi,

    Would you be so kind to list some of these plurals that have a "Z" sound rather than an "S" sound.

    I just found out not to long ago that that "eyes" is really pronounce with a "z" at the end. Is there a rule to this or this is only done to avoid confusion when there are words that sound alike, such as:

    lies and lice

    eyes and ice

    Thank you,
    Edher
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Edher said:
    Hola SuZi,

    Would you be so kind to list some of these plurals that have a "Z" sound rather than an "S" sound.

    I just found out not to long ago that that "eyes" is really pronounce with a "z" at the end. Is there a rule to this or this is only done to avoid confusion when there are words that sound alike, such as:

    lies and lice

    eyes and ice

    Thank you,
    Edher

    I can see why you think this a pattern, but I don't think that is the reason!

    Lets try some random plurals:
    plurals /z/
    pins /z/
    apples /z/
    cats /s/
    dogs /z/
    essays /z/
    tasks /s/
    grammars /z/
    computers /z/
    keyboards /z/
    mice /s/
    houses /ziz/
    poster/z/

    I think the /z/ sound is quite common really - though I've never done a systematic study!
     

    Kelly B

    Curmodgeratrice
    USA English
    Reading the list, it seems to me that if the ending sound of the word is voiced, so is the plural sound, z. If the final consonant is unvoiced, the plural sounds like s. This may not be a rule, but it'll get you close.
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    US English
    I think a general thing to know is that usually:

    If /s/ stands without other consonants (or at the beggining of the word), it will almost ALWAYS be /z/.

    Some exceptions:

    bus
    serious
    case
    vase
    this

    There are others, but there are many more that follow what I said above than there are exceptions... at least what I've come across. <-- (notice, 2 /s/ make /s/, not /z/.)




    Jon
     
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