life is a beach

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kbbylily

Senior Member
france, français
hello,
I 've seen this sentence several times on T-shirts.
I think this a joke, a pun with " life is a bitch", I am right?
the thing that makes me not be sure is that I saw that on children T-shirt and I don't think people would buy their kid a clothe saying that?
could you brighten this for me please?
 
  • zazap

    Senior Member
    Canada, French and English
    Well, you're right, it comes from "life is a bitch". The thing is that when you change it to "life is a beach", the meaning is so different that it's OK even for kids, you know? It means I love the beach, I love the holidays, I love summer. Beach and sun, that's life!
     

    spikie

    Senior Member
    USA, UK English
    Although the expression 'life's a beach' may have originated as a pun for 'life's a bitch', it's also a statement on it's own, that life is not a bitch at all, rather, life's a beach. As zazap said, it signifies that the wearer views life as a pleasant beach - sun, surf, relaxation...
     

    kbbylily

    Senior Member
    france, français
    Well, you're right, it comes from "life is a bitch". The thing is that when you change it to "life is a beach", the meaning is so different that it's OK even for kids, you know? It means I love the beach, I love the holidays, I love summer. Beach and sun, that's life!

    Yes ok. I understand what you mean but... I find this a little bit offending anyway because, me, as a french person I think about "life is a bitch" so I guess that natives english will thing about that too. And it is made so we think about it. so I find it improper for a child... (my boyfriend had one when he was a child with garfield sayiong that, but his parents didn't speak english at all :p)
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Yes ok. I understand what you mean but... I find this a little bit offending anyway because, me, as a french person I think about "life is a bitch" so I guess that natives english will thing about that too. And it is made so we think about it. so I find it improper for a child... (my boyfriend had one when he was a child with garfield sayiong that, but his parents didn't speak english at all :p)
    I don't think it would strike most English-speakers' ears as inappropriate for a kid. It is cute and clever-sounding and also, it really means that life isn't "a bitch"
     

    zazap

    Senior Member
    Canada, French and English
    In either case, I read a pun, i.e. de la mer(de) and mère. Although Pieanne's is closer to "bitch". :)
    I wasn't thinking about "mère", my French housemate always says "C'est la merde", or "c'est vraiment la merde"...That's what I was thinking about, just like pieanne;)
     

    Denis the fatalist

    Senior Member
    France/French
    Puzzled.
    Having ever enjoyed this kind of jokes in French, I couldn't help at first to try it also in English (this kind, not necessarily this one) until my first host in L.A kindly explained I would be the only one to laugh, since the english pronunciation (of for instance here beach vs bitch) was not the same at all. So I assumed that no english speaking native would do or even notice it.
    As for the sub-thread, a friend of mine used a long time ago to answer :
    "chacun sa mère", a phrase which have had since some success...
     
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