Life's incessant ceremonies leap everlasting, <humans spring eternal on hope's breast>

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist and his brother and sisters met to discover a conspiracy.

Life's incessant ceremonies leap everlasting, humans spring eternal on hope's breast and frying pans without fires are often far between: the sum of my long life's wisdom that evening, tendered in a spirit of creative anxiety, answered by Random with a nod and a friendly obscenity.
We were in the library, and I was seated on the edge of the big desk.
["Sign of The Unicorn" of The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny]
I'd like to know to what "humans spring eternal on hope's breast" means here.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It seems to me the author is saying that humans are always hopeful. "Hope springs eternal" can be found on a Google search. It is listed as a proverb and gives in depth explanations.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    This paragraph is a muddle (or a blend, depending on how kind one is feeling) of various expressions and sayings. This part means that there is always a new person who comes along filled with hope
     

    Vorkosigan

    New Member
    Serbian
    I was actually wondering about this very same quote, so it's good to see a part of my question is already answered. Still-

    This paragraph is a muddle (or a blend, depending on how kind one is feeling) of various expressions and sayings.
    Could someone please tell which sayings and proverbs are blended here? 'Hope springs eternal' has already been mentioned, but what about the first part of the sentence, and the third? Thanks so much in advance :)
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I find the whole passage pretty much incomprehensible. I have no idea what “frying pans without fires are often far between” really means and how it fits with the rest of the cognitively discombobulated sentence. As for these remarks being greeted with “a nod of friendly obscenity”, it sounds very unpleasant but equally incongruous! Is the author attempting to write in the deliberately garbled style of Joyce or Becket?
     

    Vorkosigan

    New Member
    Serbian
    Yes, kind of. Zelazny was a part of the new wave of scifi in the 60's and the 70's and he often experimented with style. I figured “frying pans without fires are often far between” refers to the idiom "out of the frying pan into the fire", as in, you can rarely escape trouble without getting into some new trouble. But the first part (Life's incessant ceremonies leap everlasting)... I would really like to find the saying that got inverted there...
     
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