Ligne Jaune

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New Member
English
Would anybody be able to shed light on the phrase 'ligne juane' as used below:

Samedi, le ministre de l’Immigration a jugé, sur RTL, que le cinéaste «a plus que franchi la ligne jaune […] lorsqu’il dit que "les clandestins de Calais sont l’équivalent des Juifs en 43"».

Many thanks,
 
  • OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    I believe you also say "to trespass/cross the line" in English.
    Here it's fig., a moral line.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    he went over the line when he said that (no need to give a color)
    or
    his comment was really out-of-bounds

    PS For me both of these expressions bring to mind sports rules rather than highway lines. Maybe because in the US we don't have this obsession about the line down the middle of the road--it's technically illegal to cross it, but not the worst thing you can do for us... In any case, "yellow" line would not bring anything particular to mind. Line all alone is enough.
     
    Last edited:

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Hello,

    The "ligne jaune", which is now white by the way, refers to the continuous line painted on the middle of the road where overtaking is strictly forbidden by the Highway Code.
    So I guess that figuratively it means committing a serious offence if you ever cross the line.
     

    Jano94

    Senior Member
    French - France
    While the meaning is clear in posts above...
    Litterally, this yellow line refer to the (previously yellow, presently white) line painted on road to mean "do not pass"
     

    dratuor

    Senior Member
    french - france
    it's an idiomatic phrase.

    you can translate it by "cross the line"

    le cinéaste «a plus que franchi la ligne jaune
    the director has more than crossed the line
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hello,

    The "ligne jaune", which is now white by the way, refers to the continuous line painted on the middle of the road where overtaking is strictly forbidden by the Highway Code.
    So I guess that figuratively it means committing a serious offence if you ever cross the line.
    Yes, this phrase is very surprising, because of the colour. The usual phrase in France is "franchir la ligne blanche", because this line is painted white in France, and also in Belgium, I think.
    But if you wear Ray-bans all day long...
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    Yes, this phrase is very surprising, because of the colour. The usual phrase in France is "franchir la ligne blanche", because this line is painted white in France, and also in Belgium, I think.
    Je ne trouve pas cela surprenant ; pour moi l'expression est fixée telle quelle à "franchir la ligne jaune".
    Je n'ai jamais entendu dire "franchir la ligne blanche", a fortiori au sens figuré.
    Au sens propre, on dit plus volontiers "franchir la ligne continue".

    Idem il me semble en allemand, bien que les lignes des routes allemandes ne soient plus peintes en jaune depuis belle lurette.
    Le jaune est signe d'avertissement, d'interdiction ou de danger. Les lignes provisoires durant les travaux sont toujours (= encore) peintes en jaunes.
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Je ne trouve pas cela surprenant ; pour moi l'expression est fixée telle quelle à "franchir la ligne jaune".
    Je n'ai jamais entendu dire "franchir la ligne blanche", a fortiori au sens figuré.
    Au sens propre, on dit plus volontiers "franchir la ligne continue".

    Idem il me semble en allemand, bien que les lignes des routes allemandes ne soient plus peintes en jaune depuis belle lurette.
    Le jaune est signe d'avertissement, d'interdiction ou de danger. Les lignes provisoires durant les travaux sont toujours (= encore) peintes en jaunes.
    Exact, tout comme en Grande Bretagne où la double ligne jaune peinte sur le bord de la chaussée signale l'interdiction formelle de stationner.
     
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