like a lain to boot

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Axelroll

Senior Member
Spanish (Spain)
Hello everybody:

Could someone please help me to understand what the phrase "like a lain to boot" means in this context?: a cop says that, being on night duty, he went to a prostitute's pad, had sex with her, and when he left her apartment he found he had been "clipped like a lain to boot", because the woman had stolen two C's from him, that is, two hundred dollars. I know that "to clip" means rob or swindle, but I don't know what "like a lain to boot" means. It might be a typo, because I can't find "lain" as a sustantive in any dictionary, nor even in slang dictionaries. Any idea?

Thanks.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    1. Is this a quote? If so, where did it come from.
    2. Did you hear it or read it?
     

    Axelroll

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    It's a quote from Chester Himes's Run, Man, Run, a novel set in New York's 1960's.

    Finally I found this in the Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang:

    Lane; lain; laine noun a sucker, a gullible victim US, 1933

    So, understanding "to boot" as "to kick out of her house", the phrase would mean something like "robbed like a sucker who's kicked out of the house afterwards", am I right?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a quote from Chester Himes's Run, Man, Run, a novel set in New York's 1960's.

    Finally I found this in the Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang:

    Lane; lain; laine noun a sucker, a gullible victim US, 1933

    So, understanding "to boot" as "to kick out of her house", the phrase would mean something like "robbed like a sucker who's kicked out of the house afterwards", am I right?
    No, I'm afraid you are wrong. To boot certainly does not mean "who's kicked out of the house afterwards".

    In this context "to boot" is probably being used in its meaning of "also". (You will find that meaning in the WR dictionary at the bottom of the entry for "boot"). That is not clear from the quotation you have given - did something else happen to him as well as having his money taken?
     

    Axelroll

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    No, I'm afraid you are wrong. To boot certainly does not mean "who's kicked out of the house afterwards".

    In this context "to boot" is probably being used in its meaning of "also". (You will find that meaning in the WR dictionary at the bottom of the entry for "boot"). That is not clear from the quotation you have given - did something else happen to him as well as having his money taken?
    Many thanks, Andygc, your suggestion makes perfect sense. The complete phrase is: "you think I was going to admit knocking off a piece while I was supposed to be on duty and being clipped like a lain to boot?" I always try to be concise on my questions for saving time but I always forget also that full context is essential.
     
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