Likewise / Also

alatien34

Senior Member
France, French
Hello,

I'm having trouble with a sentence. I used the word "Also" in it 2 times and looking at the synonyms on the Internet, I came upon this word "Likewise" that I rarely use as a French trying to speak English. Therefore, I don't know if "Likewise" and "Also" can be used in an interchangeable way. HEre's my sentence:

"This disaster also awakened a long-dormant sense of civic solidarity revealing that there is also something good in the human nature."

Is it possible to replace the word also in the two cases? I'm discussing the impact of the 9/11 attacks on American citizens.

=>
"Likewise, this disaster also awakened a long-dormant sense of civic solidarity revealing that there is likewisealso something good in the human nature."

The first one seems correct to me but not the second one...:(

Thanks in advance for your help!!! :)
 
  • Iznogoud

    Senior Member
    French - Canada
    "Likewise" se traduit littéralement par "de la même manière". Ça fait donc référence à quelque chose de similaire qui a été expliqué précédemment, ce qui ne semble pas être le cas ici.

    "Also" se traduit par "également" ou "aussi", ce qui n'établit pas de comparaison entre les choses. C'est, je pense, ce qui est voulu dans la première partie de la phrase.

    Je changerais la fin de la phrase pour éviter la répétition de also, peut-être comme ceci: "there is still something good in the human nature".
     
    United States -- English
    Alatien,

    Let me first say that for a non-native english speaker, your english is FANTASTIC. Well done.

    Iznogoud explained the difference between "Also" and "Likewise" very well. He (she?) is correct in saying that "likewise" is seen at the beginning of the phrase, except for one exception: after a semicolon.

    Regarding your sentence, I would say this:

    This disaster also awakened a long-dormant sense of civic solidarity, revealing that there is also something good in human nature.

    Notice the comma I added after the word "solidarity," which makes the repetition of the word "also" less evident, and makes the sentence flow better. Also, note that I removed the definite article from in front of "human nature." The term "the human nature" is never used in english, and would sound awkward; it is always used without any article.
     

    alatien34

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Hello again! :)

    Thanks a lot for your help and interesting explanations! Yet, I'm still having this one little problem:

    In English, is it OK to repeat the same word in the same sentence? (because, in French, we're suppose to avoid this)

    Now a question Songeuse: Given the fact that I'm discussing the impact of a crisis on American citizens, I'm adding arguments and although I like your suggestion (I would be happy to avoid the repetition of the word "also":p) it seems to contradict the other post... but maybe I'm just missing something.

    Here's the whole context:

    "In fact, the title of the movie may rather apply to the strength and courage of all these human beings who, despite their repressed rage or sadness, managed to make some kind of progress out from under the trauma. Although everything is different, life goes on anyway. This disaster also awakened a long-dormant sense of civic solidarity, revealing that there is also something good in the human nature."

    Is it of any help... to help me? :D
     
    United States -- English
    Alatien,

    "managed to make some kind of progress out from under the trauma." I think I know what you are trying to say, but this doesn't make sense. I would use: "managed to overcome the trauma and get on with their lives. Although everything has changed, life must continue."

    Given this context, I would say that "Likewise" would not fit in to the final sentence anywhere. Although it is preferable to avoid using the same word twice in a sentence, it is not explicitly wrong grammatically.
     
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