LIME TEA or LIME FLOWER TEA?

kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
My bilingual dictionary gives me two translations for this herbal infusion, which people drink when they feel nervous in Spain.

Do English people use this expression?

I think LIME FLOWER TEA sounds better.

I hope this is a linguistic question :(

Cheers
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Be aware that the tree which in England is called the "lime tree" is in America known as the "linden". In American English, "lime tree" would be understood to refer only to the tree which produces a type of citrus fruit, and it is not generally known in North America that the word "lime" also refers to the linden. You therefore might also think of calling it "linden flower tea", or "linden blossom tea".
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    So if I were in New York I should ask for a cup of LINDEN BLOSSOM TEA.
    And perhaps in the UK I should ask for a cup of LIME TEA/LIME FLOWER TEA.

    Thanks a lot :)
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    Lime tea could be interpreted as tea made with the citrus fruit, so it is usually Lime Flower tea to identify it as coming from the flowers of a Tilia europaea
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    MrsP and I have worked our way through most of the available herb/flower/fruit teas/infusions available here. (Context for my comments below :))

    If I saw lime tea, or lime flower tea, I would expect it to be a version of lemon tea - normal tea with an extra flavour of limes. The connection with linden would be a complete mystery to us.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm with panj and MrsP here.

    Whenever I come across "lime tea", it seems to be in conjunction with something else (eg "mandarin and lime"), and to mean "lime as in citrus fruit". Nothing to do with lime flower/linden flower.

    Perhaps we phlegmatic Brits don't get excited enough to need the relevant infusions...
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Here's what at least one AusE speaker has to say. Hysterical bunch, those Aussies.

    Lime-Flower Tea.

    To half an ounce of lime-flowers pour one pint of boiling water; allow the tea to stand for about ten minutes, pour it into a cup, sweeten with honey, and drink it perfectly hot.
    This tea, from its antispasmodic quantities, is a safe remedy in cases of indigestion, and is also beneficial when administered for hysteria.
    http://theoldfoodie.blogspot.com/2005/11/tea-time-memories.html

    To add a little contention:

    Lime flower tea since old times has been drunk in the case of fever and cold. It reduces irritability and inflammation in the mouth, throat and epipharynx and alleviates dry cough. It is drunk when you have a cold as it promotes sweating and removal of toxic substances from the body. Lime flower tea is a natural tea of pleasant taste curing cold.

    Tiliae flos
    I find that Tiliae flos are Linden flowers, not lime flowers.

    "Name︰Tiliae flos (Linden flowers)" http://www.hilda-health.com/sdp/90097/4/pd/1989664.html

    This infusion, Pompadour Lime Flower Tea, shows linden leaves and flowers on the box, here.

    So is lime flower tree citrus or linden? I am confused.

    More confusion with this: "
    Tilia x europaea

    christopher spence Thu Mar 8 2007
    wild common lyme can be found in south bedfordshire near to leighton buzzard and luton". http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Tilia+x+europaea

    Yet another vote for linden trees:

    Lime flower Tea 50g [TEALIMEFLOWER] - £2.35 : Shiner's, Herbs and ...

    Shiner's Lime flower Tea 50g [TEALIMEFLOWER] - Latin Name: Tilia spp. Other names: Linden Blossom, Linden Flower One of the most pleasant tasting herb teas ...
    www.shinersherbs.co.uk/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=212 - 23k -
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It was dipping a madeleine in a cup of lime-flower tea that started Proust off:

    And suddenly the memory returns. The taste was that of the little crumb of madeleine which on Sunday mornings at Combray (because on those mornings I did not go out before church-time), when I went to say good day to her in her bedroom, my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of real or of lime-flower tea. Remembrance of Things Past: Swan's Way.

    Other translations have "lime blossom tea" or "lime tea". I agree with GWB. In the States, I have been able to find it only as "linden blossom/ flower tea".

    Edit: a link on the curative benefits of Tilia europea, also known as: Lime blossoms, Linden flowers, Tilia.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Thank you very much,

    I've never known how to translate this infusion into English properly. As you can see it depends on the country, what you call the tree, whether people are familiar with it or not, and even on what translators of Proust decided what the best translation was. In Spain it is called TILA and everybody knows what it is; you can ask for one anywhere.

    Cheers :)
     

    thuja

    Senior Member
    english; united states
    Thank you very much,

    I've never known how to translate this infusion into English properly. As you can see it depends on the country, what you call the tree, whether people are familiar with it or not, and even on what translators of Proust decided what the best translation was. In Spain it is called TILA and everybody knows what it is; you can ask for one anywhere.

    Cheers :)
    The north American tilia (tilia Americana),found in temperate eastern North America, is known popularly as either linden or basswood. As regards the tea made from the flowers, it is definitely not a widely known product, although "linden tea" produces far more google hits than "basswood tea".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top