...limited her allowance and what she could buy

lokasseyve

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi,
In order to prevent Janice from spending money foolishly, Ned limited her allowance and what she could buy.

I wrote this passage. I'm not sure if the underlined part sounds natural. Would "limited the amount of her allowance and restricted what she could buy" work better?

Thank you so much.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It depends on what you mean: did Ned do two things or one? Did he limit her allowance, which, as a consequence, limited what she could buy? Or did he limit her allowance and also give her a list of things she wasn't allowed to buy?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps combine the two elements, like this: "Ned reduced her allowance and restricted what she could buy."
     

    lokasseyve

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Hi, Parla
    They are parent and child.
    And that was Janice's first time getting allowance from her Dad.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Well, if it was her first allowance, then Copyright's "reduced" won't work. "Limited" would also have suggested to me that he reduced it. I think you need to spell out what you mean, Lokasseyve—i.e., that Ned gave his daughter Janice a small allowance, with restrictions on what she was permitted to buy.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top