linguaggio squadrista

byrne

Senior Member
English - UK (Londoner)
Good morning all.
I was reading the headlines and a comment on Grillo's choice of language at the Sanremo Nusic Festival caught my eye. The article deemed it "squadrista". Googling the term, it seems to be applied to particularly "vocal" politicians. Does it mean threatening? bullying? loutish? fascist?

Il linguaggio usato da alcuni illustri esponenti del partito è volgare, offensivo e squadrista

The language used by some eminent party members is vulgar, offensive and brutish..

Thanks
 
  • Gianfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    There's a reference to Fascism. "Squadristi" were those groups of Fascists who phisically attacked the Mussolini's opponents, especially before the regime was established. "bullying" and "threatening" seem good options to me.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I think I’d go for “fascistic” myself. “Bullying” and “threatening” are more generic. “Squadrist” is a term I never recall coming across before now, though I studied the rise of fascism at A level.
     

    byrne

    Senior Member
    English - UK (Londoner)
    I think I’d go for “fascistic” myself. “Bullying” and “threatening” are more generic. “Squadrist” is a term I never recall coming across before now, though I studied the rise of fascism at A level.
    :tick:Nor do I

    I'm not sure about fascistic though as I have seen it applied to left-leaning politicians as well as right, which may sound a bit odd unless it is used as a "double" insult.... Is it synonymous with fascista in Italian?
     

    Gianfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I discarded "fascistic" because it sounds a bit too strong to my ears. "Fascista" and "squadrista" are not synonimous. "Squadrismo" was part of Fascism, but is now used in the sense I mentioned: to label a violent behaviour against political opponents. Of course it recalls Fascism, but I would go for a more generic term in this case.
     

    DreamTheater84

    New Member
    Italian
    I think the word means "fascist" because "squadrismo" is a political and social occurence born in Italy during the fascism.

    Although it was coined to describe fascist extremists, now the word has acquired a broader meaning and it can be used to describe violent extremists of any political party.
    Sure, but I think the choise of the word "squadrista" is not accidental. Probably they use this word (referring to its Italian origin) because they talk about Grillo (so about an Italian situation).
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    byrne

    Senior Member
    English - UK (Londoner)
    I prefer bullying or brutish since the reference is to language. Thuggish makes me think of behaviour more than language.
    Ciao Rrose, I think that the term describes the style of delivery rather than the content, though I may be wrong.
     

    DreamTheater84

    New Member
    Italian
    the article talks about Italian context (Grillo's behaviour) that's why there is the term "squadrista" that, according to me, can be translated "fascist"... because, even if it describes organized violence in general, in this case the journalist wants to underline an Italian undertone.
    I don't know if what I want explain is clear :)
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    the article talks about Italian context (Grillo's behaviour) that's why there is the term "squadrista" that, according to me, can be translated "fascist"... because, even if it describes organized violence in general, in this case the journalist wants to underline an Italian undertone.
    I don't know if what I want explain is clear :)
    I understand what you mean but I think in English "Fascist" is a very much over-used expression that usually refers more to authoritarian, narrow-minded thinking than thuggery, which I think is what squadrista means.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Yes, I think you were clear. Is it not just as probable that an Italian writer uses a phenomenon well-known to Italians for clarity, rather than to underscore something essentially Italian about the situation? Other Italian posters here seem to think that a more generic translation is preferable.

    Edit: I think rrose is bang on about the immediate authoritarian connotation in English. I proposed "fascistic" to sidestep that a bit, but I'm not sure of that now.
     
    Last edited:

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Yes, I think you were clear. Is it not just as probable that an Italian writer uses a phenomenon well-known to Italians for clarity, rather than to underscore something essentially Italian about the situation? Other Italian posters here seem to think that a more generic translation is preferable.

    .
    Precisely.
    If you check the Treccani definition, it is clear that nowadays the term has a more general meaning which is not only related to fascism.

    squadrista s. m. e agg. [der. di squadra (d’azione)] (pl. m. -i). – Chi faceva parte delle squadre d’azione fasciste; estens., fig. (anche f.), antidemocratico e violento: più che una moderatrice mi sembri una squadrista. Come agg., nel sign. di squadristico: la violenza squadrista.
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    I understand what you mean but I think in English "Fascist" is a very much over-used expression that usually refers more to authoritarian, narrow-minded thinking than thuggery, which I think is what squadrista means.
    I have to agree with rrose here. Applying the specific term "fascist" (whether lower or upper case it carries a very distinct meaning in AE) versus the term "thuggery" which is much more generic in AE, might be a translation less true to the spirit of the original.

    Phil
     

    DreamTheater84

    New Member
    Italian
    Oh, sorry. I thought that the article was written in English and that the member Byrne wanted traslate it to Italian!
    Sorry again.
    I'm agree with rrose17: thuggery could be right.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top