Liquids of acid derivative vs Acid derivative liquids

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Esad Nr

Senior Member
Turkish
Liquids of acid derivative

Acid derivative liquids

I wrote two pehrase above . In the first phrase Is “derivative “ used as a noun and is it used as an adjective in second phrase ? All translater engines say that both has same meaning but I couldn’t understand if “of” changes meaning
 
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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us the complete sentence in which you would use the phrase, and explain the situationin which you would say or write it. We don't discuss words or phrases out of contextinthis forum.
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Please give us the complete sentence in which you would use the phrase, and explain the situationin which you would say or write it. We don't discuss words or phrases out of contextinthis forum.
    Sorry . Let me say ;
    1)Liquids of acid derivative are delivered in barrels of 500 kg.

    2)Acid derivative liquids are delivered in barrels of 500 kg.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm no expert, and I can't find any supporting evidence online, but I suspect it would be 'Liquid acid derivatives . . . '. It just sounds a more natural word order.
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I'm no expert, and I can't find any supporting evidence online, but I suspect it would be 'Liquid acid derivatives . . . '. It just sounds a more natural word order.
    Do you mean “Liquids of acid derivative... “ has same meaning but not natural or it is totally wrong?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know what it means, but my suggestion sounds more natural than the others. I don't know what they mean either.

    If you are familiar with acid derivatives and the field or industry in which they are talked about/used/transported, you'll probably know where to look for a more informed answer than I can offer.
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I don't know what it means, but my suggestion sounds more natural than the others. I don't know what they mean either.

    If you are familiar with acid derivatives and the field or industry in which they are talked about/used/transported, you'll probably know where to look for a more informed answer than I can offer.
    Thanks for your close interest but actually I wonder if “of” changes meaning.
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm sorry, I don't know what 'liquids of acid derivative' means. Have you seen it somewhere?

    I'm beginning to think this might be more of a technical/scientific/chemical question than a language/grammar question.
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I'm sorry, I don't know what 'liquids of acid derivative' means. Have you seen it somewhere?

    I'm beginning to think this might be more of a technical/scientific/chemical question than a language/grammar question.
    Okay . Then I ask my questintion with different example .

    Panel of steel grade is supplied every year in high quantity.

    steel grade panel is supplied every year in high quantity.
    In these sentence does of change meaning?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Panel of steel grade
    This phrase has at least one error, possibly more. The examples are also poor English. It is very difficult to advise without rewriting and yet I am not sure what you intend to say. :oops:
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    This phrase has at least one error, possibly more. The examples are also poor English. It is very difficult to advise without rewriting and yet I am not sure what you intend to say. :oops:
    I mean the panel which is made of a type of steel.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Like others, I am trying tow work out what you are trying to say. "Panels of steel" would be fine; a less common alternative to "steel panels" but having the same meaning. Adding "grade" only makes sense if you then specify the grade, but this works better with "steel panels" rather than "panels of steel":
    Grade 304 steel panels :thumbsup:
    Steel panels of grade 304 :thumbsup:
    Panels of steel grade 304 :thumbsdown:
    Grade 304 panels of steel :confused: (it seems as if the grade refers to the panels, not the steel)​
     

    Esad Nr

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Like others, I am trying tow work out what you are trying to say. "Panels of steel" would be fine; a less common alternative to "steel panels" but having the same meaning. Adding "grade" only makes sense if you then specify the grade, but this works better with "steel panels" rather than "panels of steel":
    Grade 304 steel panels :thumbsup:
    Steel panels of grade 304 :thumbsup:
    Panels of steel grade 304 :thumbsdown:
    Grade 304 panels of steel :confused: (it seems as if the grade refers to the panels, not the steel)​
    Tkank you so much . But Why is grammatically bad ?
     
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