Lithuanian: pas mumis

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AndrasBP

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hello,

My question is about the use of "pas mumis/jumis" (= at our/your place, chez nous/vous, у нас/вас, etc.) instead of "pas mus/jus".
The preposition "pas" is supposed to govern the accusative case, but "mumis" is instrumental.
I've heard "pas mumis" from native speakers a number of times, but I'm not sure if this structure is considered colloquial, dialectal, or non-standard and thus "incorrect"?
 
  • mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Hi,

    this stucture is very dialectal. I consider 'mumis' to be a long form of 'mus' in this particular example (sorry, I have no proof here). Although the dictionary says it is instrumental case I find it quite confusing, because there are two stress variations here: mùmis and mumi̇̀s . In case of 'pas mùmis ' I would definately use only the first one, whereas when expressing intsrumental c. I would use only the second one (e.g. pasinaudojo mumi̇̀s - they have used us).
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I consider 'mumis' to be a long form of 'mus' in this particular example (sorry, I have no proof here). Although the dictionary says it is instrumental case I find it quite confusing, because there are two stress variations here: mùmis and mumi̇̀s .
    Thank you for your reply.
    So are you saying that "mumis" is not really instrumental but an alternative, dialectal form of "mus"?
    If the same people who say "pas mumis" also said "pas tėvais / draugais" (Instr.) instead of "pas tėvus / draugus" (Acc.), maybe we could conclude that "mumis" here really is an instrumental form, but they don't say that, do they?
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Do you know if the forms "mumis/jumis" are ever used with other prepositions that govern the accusative case in standard Lithuanian?
    How about "apie mumis"?
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Sorry, nothing comes to mind. "Apie mumis" does not sound that unnatural, though. But, again, it calls for a dialectal context.
     
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