live like in their home country

nurdug51

Senior Member
Germany,German
I know there are already threads about like versus as.

But in this case I must be very sure that my sentence is correct.

They want to live like in their home country.

Or do I have to say:They want to live as in their home country.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    If you're writing for someone who's very particular about English that sounds 'polished', I wouldn't recommend either, Nurdug. Instead I'd use a verb phrase:
    They want to live the way they do in their home country or
    They want to live as they do in their home country:)

    I suspect some people would consider ... live like they do ... 'inelegant'.
     

    nurdug51

    Senior Member
    Germany,German
    If you're writing for someone who's very particular about English that sounds 'polished', I wouldn't recommend either, Nurdug. Instead I'd use a verb phrase:
    They want to live the way they do in their home country or
    They want to live as they do in their home country:)

    I suspect some people would consider ... live like they do ... 'inelegant'.
    Thank you for the more elegant way to express it.

    Nevertheless, as I often have difficulties in deciding whether to take as or like could you please tell me which one I would have to take if I left out the verb (do) above.

    I know that , in terms of grammar, the first one is a conjunction and the second one a preposition (I hope I remember correctly) so I see the point why I must take as in your example.

    But in my example sentence neither a verb nor a noun follow but a prepositional phrase (or whatever you would call in their home country).
    So I'm interested to know which one is grammatically correct here (even if it sounded 'polished' ;)) .
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hmmm ... I was afraid you'd say that, Nurdug:D
    If I had to choose one over the other, it would definitely be as.

    Unfortunately I can't say why I prefer as.

    I hope a grammar expert will be along soon ...:eek:
     

    nurdug51

    Senior Member
    Germany,German
    Hmmm ... I was afraid you'd say that, Nurdug:D
    If I had to choose one over the other, it would definitely be as.

    Unfortunately I can't say why I prefer as.

    I hope a grammar expert will be along soon ...:eek:
    Where are you, grammar experts???
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Like used this way is a preposition. It therefore needs an object, which would be a noun or a pronoun. In your sentence, though, you are attaching a prepositionial phrase to another preposition.

    As used here is a conjunction, and may be followed by a preposition.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "so how come like they do at home is ok..."

    No

    I feel as comfortable here as at home. (prepositional phrase)
    This place feels like home. (a noun)

    The use of like and as has been an issue in American English even before some of the less articulate crowd started stuffing "like" in every egregious sentence they utter.

    A long, long time ago a cigarette company had the well-advertised slogan "Wxxx tastes good like a cigarette should."

    Those of us of a pedantic nature jumped on it as a source of bad grammar.

    But so it goes.....
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Erm ... so how come like they do at home is okay then, GWBGE? (Or isn't it?:confused:)
    It isn't.:D

    Do you know about the Winston cigarette jingle affair, Ewie? Years ago, when cigarettes could advertise themselves on television in the US, a brand called "Winston" (named, like the other brand "Salem", after the city of Winston-Salem in the major tobacco-growing state of North Carolina) used to advertise itself with a cheerful jingle that sent
    Winston... tastes good ... like a cigarette should/Winston tastes good like .... your cigarette should!

    Partway through the campaign (and perhaps just as a calculated maneuver to draw fresh attention to it), Winston announced that they had come to realize the jingle was ungrammatical, and it became
    Winston... tastes good ... AS a cigarette should...

    There were also print advertisements that would gladden the hearts of proscriptive grammarians everywhere, showing the offensive "like" run through with a big red slash, and the word AS written above it.

    What we have here is much the same; the question is whether one thing is being compared to another, or whether we are speaking of the way something is done:

    John looks like his father.
    John is like a tiger when he is angry.
    John seems like a nice man

    BUT

    John runs the business as his father did (not like his father did)
    John wrote the letter as he had been directed (not like he had been directed)
     
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