[live your purpose] mean?

Camlearner

Senior Member
Khmer
Hi

I heard some people in workshop say [live your purpose] and no this phrase in my dictionary. It means like to follow your aims in life ? I guess! and can I also say live your aim, live your objective or live your target too because those end nouns are synonym?

Thanks.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I have never heard or seen "live your purpose", although people could probably guess what it meant. Looking on Google, it seems to be a catch phrase. I have no idea where it comes from, although the origin seems to be religious.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I heard some people in workshop say [live your purpose] and no this phrase in my dictionary. It means like to follow your aims in life ? I guess! and can I also say live your aim, live your objective or live your target too because those end nouns are synonym?
    I've never heard the phrase and can't say what it means, but it may be related to a popular book, The Purpose-Driven Life, written by a preacher, Rick Warren.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you. So maybe I can conclude the answer to my queston that is live your aim, live your objective or live your target is not available in this world.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    People sometimes invent expressions that have meaning in their particular context, but mean nothing otherwise.
    I have never heard of "live your purpose" or "live your aim"... etc.

    I could probably attach meaning to them, but I'd be speculating.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    That is too pessimistic a view!

    Have a look at http://www.fusionmarketingpower.com/ and click on "Live your target as a team". This explains how you should live the life of the consumer you are targeting. If you do this, you will be a successful marketeer.......if that's what you want!

    These phrases are catch phrases or slogans, and can mean anything the author wants them to be.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thank you. So maybe I can conclude the answer to my queston that is live your aim, live your objective or live your target is not available in this world.
    I think that you will need to look at the book I mentioned earlier to conclude what the phrase may mean. If you have heard or seen such a phrase mentioned recently, I am reasonably sure that there is some connection with Warren's book.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you all and I now stop pessimistic any more.

    So e2efour, you want to tell me that these phrases that I create by myself live your aim, live your objective or live your target can also be possible. I'm just afraid I try to think about my vocab building words, then only use them alone, not understood by English speakers.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ....
    These phrases are catch phrases or slogans, and can mean anything the author wants them to be.
    Thank you all and I now stop pessimistic any more.

    So e2efour, you want to tell me that these phrases that I create by myself live your aim, live your objective or live your target can also be possible. I'm just afraid I try to think about my vocab building words, then only use them alone, not understood by English speakers.
    The phrases are possible, but their meaning is not clear and has to be explained.

    As e2efour said, they mean whatever the author wants to them to mean.

    As Parla said, if you want to understand "live your purpose" you need to read the book where it is introduced.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thank you all and I now stop pessimistic any more.

    So e2efour, you want to tell me that these phrases that I create by myself live your aim, live your objective or live your target can also be possible. I'm just afraid I try to think about my vocab building words, then only use them alone, not understood by English speakers.

    I think there is no need for you to go around inventing things which seem obscure to native speakers. Better to stick to learning familiar idioms.

    Coining new phrases obviously CAN be done, but it is best left to people who are very confident with the language, or who have some media or marketing reason for creating new things.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Hi panjandrum, thank you.. so I think some words or phrases no context no universal common meaning understood by English speakers.

    Hi suzi br, thank you. Yes you're right. I better wait until I become more expert first although in the process of studying, I really feel curious everything of all corners of writing skill now. :)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It is a fine line, because you have to make up new sentences all the time, really, when you are using your new language. Sometimes it is hard to know which are OK and which sound odd.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you for your motivator suzi_br.

    P.S What does "It is a fine line" mean? It's something like a canal on face?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    We talk about a fine line when me mean the narrow boundary between two things. In this case: the narrow boundary between using the language to create our own conversations in ways that seem OK ... or ..... "getting it wrong" / "sounding like foreigners" when we use our second language. :)
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thak you.. suzi_br and sorry moderator for off - topic talk...

    P.S: but it's hard to say what "It is a fine line" really exactly means in my language.. although I seem to feel like understand from your explanation. Maybe a complete way of cross-cultur different idea expression !

    << Moderator note: See the threads listed at "fine line" >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Coining new phrases obviously CAN be done, but it is best left to people who are very confident with the language, or who have some media or marketing reason for creating new things.
    Yes, as Suzi has noted, you should not worry too much about very creative uses - dangerous for learners of English because they are also often assumed to have made a mistake rather than having been creative.

    In the case of 'Live your purpose', I think Parla is correct in linking it to Rick Warren's book Purpose-driven life. If you believe that God has a purpose for your life, then you will feel most fulfilled if you live (according to) that (God-given) purpose. Without that assumption, the slogan will make no sense at all.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you natkretep. So now to me, to live (that I know as intransitive verb) can be now also ok for an object to stand after it as if it change to transitive verb like kill, kiss, etc.. (to live + object[purpose]) or it not the transitive? but just some way to express ideas like an idiom.. !. So I should become less creative because afraid of often assumed to have made a mistake rather than having been creative. Thank you ;)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    There is a restricted transitive use of live:

    to live a lie
    to live a life of sin/indulgence/despair/etc.
    to live your life to the fullest
    I assume the phrase borrows from these kinds of constructions.

    Yes, creative uses are often tricky.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top