Liverpool 0 - Chelsea 0

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Arai

Senior Member
Spain - Spanish
Hi,

I now that is'draw' (0-0), but how do you say 0 when talking about sports?

Thanks a lot!
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Niil" is common for sports in BE, but I've never heard it over here in the U.S.

    In AE, sportscasters, i.e. radio-TV broadcasters of sports news, have a wide variety of terms when reading score, including:

    Nothing
    Zip
    Goose egg
    Zero

    In tennis, a common term is "love," which, as I understand it, is a corruption of the French l'oeuf (the egg)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    " sdgraham. But would they say those things, for a final score, in a formal news summary, for example?

    Here they say 'nil-all' in a news report of that score in football.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    " sdgraham. But would they say those things, for a final score, in a formal news summary, for example?

    Here they say 'nil-all' in a news report of that score in football.
    Yes, indeed. Sportscasters say just about anything. They might say zip-zip", for example.

    Note, however, that in the U.S., we have a plethora of radio broadcast stations (perhaps 3,000) as well as local television stations. "Formal news summary" is an oxymoron when applied to some of these.

    The national networks are more formal, however.

    Sportscasters try to be cute and invoke multiple clichés in an attempt to be different.

    (Once upon a time long, long ago and in a place far, far, away I worked in local radio)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Fascinating. We are getting SOME explosion of media stations here now,and informality seems to be their favourite style. My listening is still dominated by the BBC and there is a chattier element in sports broadcasting, but not in results table reading!
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I agree with sdgraham. When I worked (?) for a local radio station, long away and far ago, broadcast language was generally more formal than it is today. Still, we said things like "Prescriptivism and Descriptivism played to a scoreless tie", or "Bulwyr-Lytton zippo, and Pynchon Academy nada".

    Those were the days of "rip and read" news (sic) reporting, with copy pulled from the UPI or AP teletype continuous paper roll, and station employees customizing as they read. It was all very tame in comparison with the current style of sports reporting:

    Hemingway thumped Fitzgerald, fourteen to two.
    Maugham's South Sea Marauders were skewered by Stephen Fry's National Treasures, ten zilch.
     

    trillian13

    New Member
    English - Australian
    I've often heard " a nil-all draw " (0-0) when I watch the footy

    i.e. the game resulted in a nil-all draw between the two teams vying for the championship
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In the UK when I was a lad, the BBC score reading (on radio in pre-TV days) of football matches on Saturday evening used to be extremely formal, with the team that won being enunciated at a higher pitch, with a draw having the same pitch for each team and the losing team at a lower pitch , almost disappointed type tone. There were hundreds of thousands of pounds riding on this because of the football "pools" and the radio audience was expecting consistency and clarity and no wisecracks and literary inventiveness. Reading anything other than NIL for a team that hadn't scored, would confuse the audience and they wouldn't have know whether they'd won the jackpot or not :) Perhaps it's still like that.

    Some US reporters will use nil when presenting a "soccer" result and our local paper (what's left of it) lists the home team first but only for soccer:D
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    I'd agree with sdgraham on the list of commonly used words in AE. I'd say that the standard ways of referring to "0" in AE would be "zero" or "nothing," and I'd suggest that English learners stick to those.
    Also, "nil" sounds distinctly BE to my ear.
     

    trillian13

    New Member
    English - Australian
    I'm Australian, we tend to have a bit of a mix of both "American-isms" and "British-isms"; but without wanting to start an argument :) I would have to disagree with both Esca and Sdgraham...

    We would only ever say "nil"; only under certain circumstances "zero" and never "nothing" - in fact, "nothing" sounds very "uncomfortable" to my ear! :confused:

    The only time you would use "zero" would be when the adverse team have scored (in that case, it would be correct to say "five-zero(5-0)" for example).

    Otherwise, "nil" works in all different contexts.

    In any case, I'm not sure I would suggest that those learning English only stick to those options (zero or nothing) !:)


    I'd agree with sdgraham on the list of commonly used words in AE. I'd say that the standard ways of referring to "0" in AE would be "zero" or "nothing," and I'd suggest that English learners stick to those.
    Also, "nil" sounds distinctly BE to my ear.
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    In any case, I'm not sure I would suggest that those learning English only stick to those options (zero or nothing) !:)
    Sorry Trillan, I meant the English learners who wish to learn AE :) No offense to those who might want to learn AusE or BE, I just can't comment on those.
     

    UUBiker

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Let me ask this of native speakers-- is there ever a situation (let's leave tennis and cricket aside) where "zero" is wrong?

    (I mean, I will say that "zip" and "nothing," and "goose egg" and all those other things all sound .. perhaps like things the sports guys come up with ... but "zero" seems "unmarked" to me, as it were, so I'm just curious).

    (Incidentally, I think 0-0, or 2-2, are "ties" in American English, so I'm curious about the prevalence of that. I will say that "draw" is comprehensible but unusual.)
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I suspect it's very close to clear-cut that "tie = AmE" while "draw = BrE". In BrE one might speak of a game being tied, as it's still going on, but the final result would be called a draw (like the Black Knight tried to claim :D )

    As for zero, it will always be understandable and never "wrong" but if someone is expecting something else, it could sound odd.
     

    Redshade

    Banned
    UK
    English.
    I suspect it's very close to clear-cut that "tie = AmE" while "draw = BrE". In BrE one might speak of a game being tied, as it's still going on, but the final result would be called a draw (like the Black Knight tried to claim :D )

    As for zero, it will always be understandable and never "wrong" but if someone is expecting something else, it could sound odd.

    Hi JS.

    And don't forget that a cricket match can end as a tied or drawn game the two outcomes being different.

    Also whilst a batsman may be out for a duck (egg) with a score of 0,
    the team batting could be 135 for 0 which would be " a hundred and thirty-five for nought".

    Similarly a bowler's figures could be 27.0.97.0 which would be
    "27 overs, no maidens and 97 for nought".

    I agree that "zero" would be an alien word on a cricket pitch.

    I expect an AuE speaker would like to differ slightly on some of the above
    just to further confuse things.:)
     

    UUBiker

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Also whilst a batsman may be out for a duck (egg) with a score of 0,
    the team batting could be 135 for 0 which would be " a hundred and thirty-five for nought".
    It's good to know that "eggs" of various sorts, albeit from different fowl, can be used to serve up scores on both sides of the Atlantic (and Pacific, I suppose). I always like to figure out what, if anything, is common (though what's different is just as fascinating). I'm not going to ask about the use of "for" in place of "to." Cricket seems (and looks in movies) far too complicated.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Disclaimer: I know nothing about cricket other than what I've picked up through ambient noise but I think it means they've scored 135 runs for no batters out of the game. Thus it's not a comparison 'to' the other side's score at all. So you're doing better at 135 for 0 than at 135 for 5, no matter what the score of the other team.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Let me ask this of native speakers-- is there ever a situation (let's leave tennis and cricket aside) where "zero" is wrong?
    In BrE, you'd need to leave football (AmE soccer) aside too. And rugby, I think.
    "Zero" is unmarked in some contexts, but definitely not in others...
     

    Redshade

    Banned
    UK
    English.
    A 'scoreless draw' is usually preferred to a 'nil-all draw' in the UK.

    rover
    Hi Rover.

    Whilst I've probably heard scoreless draw on the radio or read it in the papers I have never heard this particular phrase used in the vernacular.

    In the pub it would be "nil-nil", or, in this part of the world "nowt-all".
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    In the UK when I was a lad, the BBC score reading (on radio in pre-TV days) of football matches on Saturday evening used to be extremely formal, with the team that won being enunciated at a higher pitch, with a draw having the same pitch for each team and the losing team at a lower pitch , almost disappointed type tone. There were hundreds of thousands of pounds riding on this because of the football "pools" and the radio audience was expecting consistency and clarity and no wisecracks and literary inventiveness. Reading anything other than NIL for a team that hadn't scored, would confuse the audience and they wouldn't have know whether they'd won the jackpot or not :) Perhaps it's still like that.
    This is absolutely true. In fact, the controlled and unvarying modulation of the announcing of those football results at 5pm on a Saturday was a feature as fixed in the life of the nation as the shipping forecast or the Queen's Christmas broadcast. If you were to draw a graph of the phonological variation in the reading of the footy results, it would look rather like a low peak with sides of equal gradient, with a flat bit on top, (the flat bit being the breathy pause after the announcement of the winning team's score, before the descent into disappointment noted in the previous post).
     
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    echo_zkl

    Senior Member
    Mandarin - Mainland China
    "Niil" is common for sports in BE, but I've never heard it over here in the U.S.

    In AE, sportscasters, i.e. radio-TV broadcasters of sports news, have a wide variety of terms when reading score, including:

    Nothing
    Zip
    Goose egg
    Zero

    In tennis, a common term is "love," which, as I understand it, is a corruption of the French l'oeuf (the egg)
    Fanscinating. I like the term "Goose egg":D , as we Chinese do except it's expressed in the circumstance of exam score only.
     
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