Lo and behold..

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the-pessimist

Senior Member
English, United Kingdom
how do you say 'lo and behold' in french?

i have a french friend, and i cannot explain it fully!

e.g. .... lo and behold.. this happened.. etc etc..
 
  • rsweet

    Senior Member
    English, North America
    You should wait for a native speaker for this, but in a pinch, I'd guess that the ubiquitous "et voilà" might work.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    lo and behold
    something that you say when you tell someone about something surprising that happened.
    I went into a bar just next to our hotel and, lo and behold, who should I see sitting there but Jim Gibson.

    Je suis allé dans un bar tout près de notre hôtel, et, ô surprise, devine qui était assis là ? Jim Gibson.
    ô surprise could be replaced by tiens-toi bien, or even surprise, surprise.
    lo and behold
    used as an exclamation:
    Lo and behold! You did come after all!
    Tiens tiens ! Tu es venu, finalement !

    Source of the English language definitions and examples
    IdiA()
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    Je ne connaissais pas l'expression. Le Harrap's suggère simplement voilà, ce qui me semble un peu court pour exprimer la surprise du locuteur.
    Tes références son excellentes.
    On pourrait trouver de nombreuses variantes selon les contextes pour exprimer la surprise.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Is it the same as " behold ye" ?
    no it is not.

    Behold ye is old English, simply meaning look! You would only see that in an old translation of Biblical scripture.

    lo and behold is a set phrase expressing surprise, commonly used today in speech as well as writing--Dickens used it in the 19th Century, but it does not sound outdated even today.

    "Lo" came from the Middle English loke (to look).
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hi,
    In latin, there exists the adverb "ecce", which is translated into English as "lo" or "behold".
    (I think the Lewis and Short dictionary displays "lo" and "behold" under the latin entry "Ecce".)

    In French, the Gaffiot dictionary displays "voici" and "voilà" under the latin entry "ecce". which makes these words a perfect translation for "lo and behold" in a semantical point of view, but these words lack a somewhat solemn taste, because for some obscure reason, French kept the latin habit of saying "ecce" all the time, whereas for some other reason, English did not.

    But the Bible, (at least its latin version, the Vulgate) is full of "ecce", (as in "ecce homo"), which are always translated as "lo" or "behold" in English, making thus the phrase "lo and behold" sound solemnly biblical.
     

    toban

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi,
    In latin, there exists the adverb "ecce", which is translated into English as "lo" or "behold".
    (I think the Lewis and Short dictionary displays "lo" and "behold" under the latin entry "Ecce".)

    In French, the Gaffiot dictionary displays "voici" and "voilà" under the latin entry "ecce". which makes these words a perfect translation for "lo and behold" in a semantical point of view, but these words lack a somewhat solemn taste, because for some obscure reason, French kept the latin habit of saying "ecce" all the time, whereas for some other reason, English did not.

    But the Bible, (at least its latin version, the Vulgate) is full of "ecce", (as in "ecce homo"), which are always translated as "lo" or "behold" in English, making thus the phrase "lo and behold" sound solemnly biblical.
    That's interesting! I don't think of this expression as having biblical connotations, but one of the first examples that comes to mind of the word "behold" is from an old translation of the Bible: "Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us." (Matthew 1:23 in the King James Version).

    An online search, however, finds no hits of "lo and behold" in the KJV. I suppose that either "lo" or "behold" stood on its own at the time of translation in 1611.

    The fact that we use both together makes it sound emphatic, like "look and see!"

    Sans perdre le sens dans une traduction trop littérale, est-ce qu'il y existe une expression en français qui insiste sur le fait de regarder et voir?
     
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