lo and behold!

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student

New Member
chile, español
what mean the phrase : lo and behold! , I'm learning english and this is difficult for me...

thanks a lot !
 
  • jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Lo and behold is an expression that is difficult to find other words to describe.
    It means the same as "Walah!" with emphasis on the final "ah" I have no idea how to spell that. I don't even know if this is a real word. It may be taken from another language. Now, what is walah? Here is an example:

    "I was looking for my wallet everywhere, under the couch, under my bed, in the car and then, lo and behold, it was right there on the kitchen counter."

    I was looking for my wallet everywhere and walah, there it was!

    There must be a history of "lo and behold". David, where are you? Basically, I would say it means, "wouldn't you know it?" or "ahaaa"!
     

    Ladydean

    Member
    USA English
    And I'm guessing it's French: oo, got this off of Word Ref:

    et voilà qu’il était là: lo and behold
    voilà adv: there
    voilà prep: there

    But I don't speak French, so that's all I know
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    "Lo" is an Old English interjection used to show surprise or call attention to someone or something. And "behold" means to look upon. So, loosely translated, it is "Hey! Look at this!"
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    This thread has reminded me of an English expression whose meaning I ignore:

    Oi!

    Does it have a meaning or a context to be used in?

    Thanks in advance.
     

    Mila

    New Member
    I have heard that expression used in two different ways.

    In the USA, people say "Oi! You!" and it pretty much means "Hey you". It's a way of getting peoples' attention.

    In England, I have heard it used it as an exclamation, in sort of a "whoah" sense. As in this sentence: "Oi! Would you look at that! A flying fish!"
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Lady B- you wrote, æ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This thread has reminded me of an English expression whose meaning I ignore"

    It would be better to say, "...whose meaning I don't know"

    Ignore usually means to consciously avoid paying attention to something.
     

    hormiguita

    Senior Member
    San Diego, Calif. (English)
    Mila said:
    I have heard that expression used in two different ways.

    In the USA, people say "Oi! You!" and it pretty much means "Hey you". It's a way of getting peoples' attention.

    In England, I have heard it used it as an exclamation, in sort of a "whoah" sense. As in this sentence: "Oi! Would you look at that! A flying fish!"
    People say "Oi!" here in the U.S.? I always thought of it as a British expression. Do they say it more on the East Coast?
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot Cuchufléte! I didn't know that. In Spanish:

    Lo ignoro = No lo sé = I don't know it.

    Ignorar a alguien = to ignore someone.

    That's why I got them confused.
     

    blinkopathe

    Member
    French
    Voilà is indeed a French word, Its use in other languages such as German and English was imported through the show business, mostly magicians who would used this interjection to accompny the "Prestige" which is the evry end of their trick.

    "And/Und/Et... Voilà!" was the common phrase.

    We also find it in Lars Von Trier's Dogville. When Thomas gives grace to her father's henchmen,he goes:

    And as the French say, "Voilà!".

    Hope this helps!

    B
     

    doodlebugger

    Senior Member
    France
    I know the dictionary translates lo and behold with voilà but I think voilà lacks the emphasis implicit in lo and behold.
    I would suggest tenez-vous bien.
    And, lo and behold, so and so appeared! = et, tenez-vous bien, untel et untel sont arrivés !
     

    walt dod

    New Member
    french from France
    Isn't "Walah" supposed to be "Voilá" or something like that?
    Hi, I would make a difference between Voilà and Wallah, of which English prononciation are very different (English makes the diffrence between V and W)
    In my view, WALLAH comes from the Arabic wallâhi, meaning by By God !
    regards,
    Walt
     
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