Lo he hecho ayer

< Previous | Next >

Istriano

Senior Member
Croatian
I would like to know how widespread is the generalized use of present perfect in Continental Spanish (that is when it replaces the present simple).

For example, in spoken Italian present simple is almost always replaced with present perfect (no matter when the action has taken place, now, a moment ago, or a century ago :)).

So, the current Madrid usage is not that strange in Romance linguistics (comparing to Italian and French usage).


Professor Lipski (one of the greatest US hispanists) says on this:
(3) The present perfect (ha dicho, etc.) is frequently used to express simple preterite action, even when the moment of speaking is included (lo he hecho ayer).


In ''Using Spanish: a guide to contemporary usage'' the authors Ronald Ernest Batchelor and Christopher J. Pountain state that:

Amongst Madrid speakers there is currently a preference for lo he hecho ayer over lo hice ayer.


(Both links are clickable ;) ).
http://books.google.es/books?id=ClzXe3qqTcoC&pg=PA378&lpg=PA378&dq=%22he+hecho+ayer%22&source=bl&ots=FFhQFc_Gsu&sig=2QGN6QeKF23MDMONbyTG6iWw0Qg&hl=hr&ei=rqzRTOqbPIv3sgaAsPGXCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22he%20hecho%20ayer%22&f=false
 
  • Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I don't know about the Madrid usage, but what I can tell you is that in some parts of northern Spain, the present perfect is (almost) not used at all (they always use the simple perfect). This is true for Asturias, and if I'm not mistaken, also for Galicia.
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    I don't know about the Madrid usage, but what I can tell you is that in some parts of northern Spain, the present perfect is (almost) not used at all (they always use the simple perfect). This is true for Asturias, and if I'm not mistaken, also for Galicia.
    In Navarre, we would never say "Lo he hecho ayer", but "Lo hice ayer".
     

    Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    In Navarre, we would never say "Lo he hecho ayer", but "Lo hice ayer".
    Agree. I didn't claim the opposite.

    What I actually meant to say is that in Asturias they would say: "Lo hice hoy" instead of "Lo he hecho hoy".

    It was not the OP's question, but I thought it was interesting.:)
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    I would like to know how widespread is the generalized use of present perfect in Continental Spanish (that is when it replaces the present simple).
    You meant when it replaces the Past simple (hice), right?

    Agree. I didn't claim the opposite.

    What I actually meant to say is that in Asturias they would say: "Lo hice hoy" instead of "Lo he hecho hoy".

    It was not the OP's question, but I thought it was interesting.:)
    I know. I can't speak for all other places in Continental Spain, so I gave info only about the place where I live, which is also in the North:).
     

    cbrena

    Senior Member
    español
    I have lived in Madrid since I was born and I normally use the present perfect in the following question instead of past simple, but I never say lo he hecho ayer.

    -¿Cuándo lo has hecho?
    -Lo hice ayer.

    -¿Cuándo lo hiciste?
    -Lo hice ayer.
     

    PABLO DE SOTO

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Es un estereotipo bastante difundido que en la España peninsular el pretérito perfecto simple tiende a desaparecer. La realidad no lo corrobora en la mayoría de los casos.
    En el habla, los hechos remotos, terminados y sin conexión con el presente se siguen relatando en ese tiempo en la mayor parte de España.
    Asimismo ese tiempo se usa cuando aparece una referencia temporal que implica un tiempo pasado y acabado ( ayer, la semana pasada etc.)
    "Cuando nos fuimos de vacaciones nos dejamos la luz encendida". Las vacaciones fueron hace meses y ya acabaron.

    Ahora bien, esa tendencia es posible que existe en una pequeña zona de Castilla así como en Cantabria. Me gustaría que alguien de por allí lo confirmara o lo negara.

    Desde hace poco me he empezado a fijar en relatos oídos en televisión o radio de gente común procedente de esas zonas y sí he observado esa tendencia.

    Recuerdo al presidente cántabro Revilla relatando algo que le había pasado el día de la Hispanidad, cuando el día ya había pasado y él contaba "yo he llegado, me he sentado etc." donde yo habría dicho "yo llegué, me senté junto a ..."

    También recuerdo a una familia palentina relatando un hecho que le había pasado hacía más de una semana " Estábamos en el camping, ha llegado la policía y nos ha hecho irnos de allí" etc.

    Seguiré prestando atención.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    There are rules when to use each tense, but in many situations both tenses are possible, past simple is objective, neutral (Mi padre murió) while past perfect is subjective, emotional (Mi padre ha muerto)...

    It's like will and going to future in English, in 50 % of cases both are possible (Tomorrow it will be / it is going to be windy in cloudy (in a weather report)),
    when two tenses overlap, one is losing and one is becoming more frequent
    (a recent paper has showed that going to future is replacing the will future
    in users born after 1950ies in Canadian English in situations where both going to and will future are possible). So, I think the same is happening in Spanish, polarization...

    The ''standard'' peninsular usage is ¿Qué ha pasado?
    The ''regional'' peninsular usage is ¿Que pasó? used in
    Galicia, Asturias, León (including Salamanca) and Canarias. :)

    An interesting find:
    '' the extension of the perfect in Peninsular Spanish is triggered by the erosion of relevance implications associated with the meaning of the perfect.''
    Howe, Lewis Chadwick; Cross-dialectal features of the Spanish present perfect: a typological analysis of form and function

    :)
     
    Last edited:

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I would like to know how widespread is the generalized use of present perfect in Continental Spanish (that is when it replaces the present simple).

    For example, in spoken Italian present simple is almost always replaced with present perfect (no matter when the action has taken place, now, a moment ago, or a century ago :)).

    So, the current Madrid usage is not that strange in Romance linguistics (comparing to Italian and French usage).


    Professor Lipski (one of the greatest US hispanists) says on this:
    (3) The present perfect (ha dicho, etc.) is frequently used to express simple preterite action, even when the moment of speaking is included (lo he hecho ayer).


    In ''Using Spanish: a guide to contemporary usage'' the authors Ronald Ernest Batchelor and Christopher J. Pountain state that:

    Amongst Madrid speakers there is currently a preference for lo he hecho ayer over lo hice ayer.


    (Both links are clickable ;) ).
    http://books.google.es/books?id=ClzXe3qqTcoC&pg=PA378&lpg=PA378&dq=%22he+hecho+ayer%22&source=bl&ots=FFhQFc_Gsu&sig=2QGN6QeKF23MDMONbyTG6iWw0Qg&hl=hr&ei=rqzRTOqbPIv3sgaAsPGXCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22he%20hecho%20ayer%22&f=false
    I wouldn't say that myself, and I haven't noticed it in Madrid either.


    Santiago.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have lived in Madrid since I was born and I normally use the present perfect in the following question instead of past simple, but I never say lo he hecho ayer.

    -¿Cuándo lo has hecho?
    -Lo hice ayer.

    -¿Cuándo lo hiciste?
    -Lo hice ayer.
    Hi
    This question doesn't make sense to me.
    i.e. When have you done it?
     

    cbrena

    Senior Member
    español
    Hi
    This question doesn't make sense to me.
    i.e. When have you done it?
    In Continental Spanish, present perfect replaces past simple. You can use both questions:

    ¿Cuándo lo has hecho?
    ¿Cuándo lo hiciste?

    Whereas the current Madrid answer would be always in past simple:

    Lo hice ayer.
     

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    In Continental Spanish, present perfect replaces past simple. You can use both questions:

    ¿Cuándo lo has hecho?
    ¿Cuándo lo hiciste?

    Whereas the current Madrid answer would be always in past simple:

    Lo hice ayer.

    I think they are different actually. In '¿cuándo lo hiciste?' there is a past context, that's to say, we are implicitly talking about yesterday, last week, etc. On the other hand, if I say '¿cuándo lo has hecho?', I think that you could have done it at any moment, including just a moment ago.


    Santiago.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Continental Spanish, present perfect replaces past simple. You can use both questions:

    ¿Cuándo lo has hecho?
    ¿Cuándo lo hiciste?

    Whereas the current Madrid answer would be always in past simple:

    Lo hice ayer.
    Gracias.
    Si no te molesta, déjame que te haga otra pregunta: ¿Te suena bien la frase "¿Cuándo lo has hecho?" ?
     

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    The ''standard'' peninsular usage is ¿Qué ha pasado?
    The ''regional'' peninsular usage is ¿Que pasó? used in
    Galicia, Asturias, León (including Salamanca) and Canarias. :)
    :)
    As far as I can tell, ¿qué pasó? is used everywhere in Spain. The difference is that most speakers would use it only for non-recent past situations (standard usage), whereas others would use it in any case (regional usage)
     

    Bark

    Senior Member
    Español de España
    Me resulta curioso este tema porque, tras haber vivido en Madrid durante mis estudios universitarios y haber convivido con gente de prácticamente todas las partes de España (viví en una residencia universitaria), jamás había oído "lo he hecho ayer". El caso es que ahora que vivo en Londres, tengo como compañero de trabajo a un salmantino que lo dice constantemente, como apuntan por arriba hizo Revilla, para expresar acciones pasadas, incluso de meses atrás, del estilo de:

    - ¿Qué hiciste el fin de semana pasado?
    - Pues he ido a un bar con mis amigos y hemos visto el fútbol.

    El tema es que el resto de españoles lo corregimos constantemente (un madileño, dos andaluces y un leonés) asegurando que está mal dicho y por lo que estoy leyendo aquí hay gente que lo usa.

    La pregunta es, ¿es correcto? Yo siempre he pensado que si el espacio temporal en el que se desarrolla la acción que estás contando ya ha terminado, se usa el simple y si todavíá estás en él, el compuesto (sea este espacio, un día, una semana, o la vida misma), ¿estoy equivocado?

    Un saludo,

    Bark
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Hola Bark, coincido contigo en que nunca diría "lo he hecho ayer".
    Pero en cambio sí podría preguntar, por ejemplo un lunes: "¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?". Me suena natural (aunque no sé por qué y si siempre he pensado así, jeje).
     

    Bark

    Senior Member
    Español de España
    Hola Bark, coincido contigo en que nunca diría "lo he hecho ayer".
    Pero en cambio sí podría preguntar, por ejemplo un lunes: "¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?". Me suena natural (aunque no sé por qué y si siempre he pensado así, jeje).

    Completamente de acuerdo pero creo que lo que dices es porque en nuestra mente, cuando decimos "¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?", estamos pesnando "¿Qué has hecho este fin de semana?" incluso aunque nos refiramos al fin de semana pasado. Sin embargo, si ya especificas, casi seguro que no dirías "¿Qué has hecho el pasado fin de semana?", ¿verdad?

    Un saludo,

    Bark
     
    Last edited:

    dexterciyo

    Senior Member
    Español - Canarias
    Hola Bark, coincido contigo en que nunca diría "lo he hecho ayer".
    Pero en cambio sí podría preguntar, por ejemplo un lunes: "¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?". Me suena natural (aunque no sé por qué y si siempre he pensado así, jeje).
    Porque consideras la acción muy cercana al presente. También coincido en que es muy natural. Diferente sería al añadirle el adjetivo pasado, pues muestra una lejanía temporal: «¿qué hiciste el fin de semana pasado?».

    P.D.: Felicidades por los cuatro mil, Aldonzalorenzo. :)
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Sí, estoy de acuerdo con los dos, Bark y Dexterciyo: si añado pasado ya no lo diría...

    PD: Gracias, Dexter :). Efectivamente, ese post que contestas ha sido mi 4.000 (parece que me refiero a una montaña).
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Gracias.
    Si no te molesta, déjame que te haga otra pregunta: ¿Te suena bien la frase "¿Cuándo lo has hecho?" ?
    En mi zona es perfectamente natural, en especial para acciones recientes:

    - Ya he hecho la compra.
    - ¿Cuándo la has hecho?
    - Esta mañana, aprovechando que la tenía libre.


    Por otro lado, lo he hecho ayer me suena extraño, pero no tendría inconveniente en usarlo hablando del fin de semana, como dice Aldonza:

    Este fin de semana he ido a Zaragoza.

    Saludos
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    En mi zona es perfectamente natural, en especial para acciones recientes:

    - Ya he hecho la compra.
    - ¿Cuándo la has hecho?
    - Esta mañana, aprovechando que la tenía libre.


    Por otro lado, lo he hecho ayer me suena extraño, pero no tendría inconveniente en usarlo hablando del fin de semana, como dice Aldonza:

    Este fin de semana he ido a Zaragoza.

    Saludos
    OK, muchas gracias, Lurrezko.
     

    Alma de cántaro

    Senior Member
    Español ibérico
    Hola Bark, coincido contigo en que nunca diría "lo he hecho ayer".
    Pero en cambio sí podría preguntar, por ejemplo un lunes: "¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?". Me suena natural (aunque no sé por qué y si siempre he pensado así, jeje).
    Es cierto. Yo también soy madrileño y siempre pregunto:

    ¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?
    ¿Qué has hecho estas vacaciones? (Ya terminadas)
    etc...

    Pero:

    ¿Qué hiciste ayer?


    Saludos,
    Pedro
     

    PABLO DE SOTO

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Es cierto. Yo también soy madrileño y siempre pregunto:

    ¿Qué has hecho el fin de semana?
    ¿Qué has hecho estas vacaciones? (Ya terminadas)
    etc...

    Pero:

    ¿Qué hiciste ayer?


    Saludos,
    Pedro
    Yo creo que ese uso es el llamado antepresente.

    En el español de la mayoría de la península lo que se ve muy cercano aunque perfectamente terminado, se dice en pretérito perfecto.

    ¿Dónde has estado estas vacaciones? , o sea, las últimas, pero
    ¿Hace diez años, dónde estuviste de vacaciones?

    ¿Qué has hecho este puente?, o sea el último puente
    ¿Qué hiciste el puente de la Inmaculada?, hace ya tiempo.
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Pero, es correcto.
    Se trata de Presente Perfecto psicológico. ;)

    http://www.hispanoteca.eu/Foro-preguntas/ARCHIVO-Foro/Pret%C3%A9rito%20perfecto%20psicol%C3%B3gico.htm

    Es más común en el subjuntivo: Espero que lo hayas hecho ayer.
    :)
    Interesante. Sin embargo, rescato dos frases de tu link:

    Al leer un libro preparativo para el examen de DELE de nivel superior, “punto final”, me surgieron algunas reflexiones sobre los valores de los tiempos pasados. Le cito:confused::):
    Yo, por mi parte, nunca he oído a la gente usar el pretérito perfecto con sentido de futuro inmediato, y aun más con un sentido psicológico.
    Saludos
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Interesante. Sin embargo, rescato dos frases de tu link:




    Saludos
    Es un estudiante de Israel que lo dice, preguntándole al profesor de español. :)
    Y el profesor le contesta. :)

    un mismo suceso puedo exponerlo diciendo:
    MURIÓ ayer
    o también
    HA MUETO ayer,
    según que lo considere como un hecho ya liquidado y ajeno al hoy, o como un hecho que todavía hoy es operante.
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Es un estudiante de Israel que lo dice, preguntándole al profesor de español. :)
    Y el profesor le contesta. :)
    En cualquier caso, de las opiniones de los foreros españoles creo que se deduce que, correcto o no, su uso es muy restringido y dialectal. Yo no lo recomendaría, francamente.

    Saludos:)
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Tanto el pretérito perfecto compuesto (he amado) como el pretérito perfecto simple (amé) denotan acciones medidas directamente y acabadas o perfectas. Esta coincidencia acerca la significación de ambos tiempos. Así se explica que varias lenguas romances los confundan en el uso real, aunque la lengua literaria procure mantener sus diferencias, como ocurre en francés y en italiano. En España se conserva bien en el habla oral y literaria el uso que hemos descrito antes; pero Galicia y Asturias muestran marcada preferencia por canté, a expensas de he cantado. Frases como Esta mañana encontré a Juan y díjome
    son características de aquellas regiones, contra el uso general español, que en este caso diría sin vacilaciones he encontrado y me ha dicho. También en gran parte de Hispanoamérica predomina absolutamente canté sobre he cantado en el habla usual, aunque entre los escritores convivan la forma simple y la compuesta en proporción variable.
    El habla popular madrileña muestra cierta inclinación en favor de he cantado. La misma inclinación se encuentra también en las provincias andinas de la República Argentina, contra el uso dominante de canté en el Río de la Plata.»
    [RAE: Esbozo de una nueva gramática de la lengua española. Madrid: Espasa Calpe, 1973, § 3.14.2]
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Según las circunstancias, podríamos decir: La guerra terminó hace tres meses, o La guerra ha terminado hace tres meses. Lo mismo ocurriría
    en Pasé por tu calle y He pasado por tu calle. La diferencia entre las dos formas usadas se funda en la extensión que quiera dar el hablante al momento presente en que habla.
    (Manuel Seco)
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Nadie duda de que sea correcto, Istriano. Sólo recopilo las opiniones de varios españoles de diversas zonas: si yo fuera extranjero y quisiera que mi español sonara natural, no lo usaría.

    In Navarre, we would never say "Lo he hecho ayer", but "Lo hice ayer".
    In my neck of the woods, lo he hecho ayer, though possible, sounds a little odd.
    I have lived in Madrid since I was born and I normally use the present perfect in the following question instead of past simple, but I never say lo he hecho ayer.
    I agree, and I'm also from Madrid.
    I wouldn't say that myself, and I haven't noticed it in Madrid either.
    Me resulta curioso este tema porque, tras haber vivido en Madrid durante mis estudios universitarios y haber convivido con gente de prácticamente todas las partes de España (viví en una residencia universitaria), jamás había oído "lo he hecho ayer".
    Es cierto. Yo también soy madrileño y siempre pregunto:
    ¿Qué hiciste ayer?
    Saludos
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    So, the difference between

    Lo he hecho ayer ~ Lo hice ayer
    Lo he hecho hoy ~ Lo hice hoy
    Ya me lo has dicho ~ Ya me lo dijiste


    is more stylistic than strictly grammatical,
    by using the present simple, many consider it more distant from the present.

    Also, the difference is neutralized with the subjunctive for most peninsular speakers:
    Espero que lo hayan echo ayer/hoy.


    I don't really trust 100% people on this forum, because many people are ashamed to accept that they use X or Y.
    Maybe they should record their informal speech. :) Many times, we don't think we ever use a certain form.
    But we do.
    So, you say, no people in Spain use the present perfect with ayer.
    But, it's pretty frequent in movies, songs and real speech (even writing on the internet) from people from Central and Northern Spain, and some parts of Southern America.
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    No entiendo qué sentido tiene abrir un hilo si no te fías de la opinión (abrumadora, en este caso) de los foreros nativos. Además, decir lo he hecho ayer no es nada de lo que avergonzarse, hombre. Si tú lo quieres usar, hazlo sin problemas.:)

    Saludos
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Dudar es saber. :)

    It's easy to say: hoy and ya are used with the present perfect, and ayer with the past simple tense.
    But, when you arrive in Madrid, and you hear hoy and ya with the past simple too, and ayer with the present perfect too,
    wouldn't be natural to feel there's something fishy about these grammar rules. :)

    And then you open the newest RAE grammar, and there's that thing called stylistics, which makes everything even less clear.
    Or more complicated, or more interesting.
    The boundaries between the tenses suddenly become less strict, with some overlapping usage appearing here, and there,
    not in all speakers, and not every time. :)
     
    Last edited:

    olaszinho

    Senior Member
    Central Italian
    "For example, in spoken Italian present simple is almost always replaced with present perfect (no matter when the action has taken place, now, a moment ago, or a century ago :))."

    This is not completely true, only in Northern Italian past simple is almost always replaced with present perfect in colloquial speech and not everywhere, for example in Bologna (which lies in the North) Past simple is still used in speech. In the South, Tuscany, Abruzzo, South of Marche and even in Rome, past simple is still used. When I hear people saying "Carlo Magno è andato" or "tanti anni fa ho fatto" my hair stands on end. :) These sentences sound incorrect to me. In French Past simple is no longer used in speech. I would say that the Italian usage is still in between French and Spanish.
    As for Spanish, I would say:
    hoy, este fin de semana, este verano, este puente he hecho
    ayer, el verano pasado, anteayer hice....
     
    Last edited:

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Language is not mathematics,
    Alex Ubago canta: Hoy te perdí una vez mas al despertar ;)

    It's extremely common to hear the past simple with Hoy and Ya, even in Madrid and Castille,
    and not only in Canarias, Galicia, Asturias, León (where the past simple is universal for most past actions).
     
    Last edited:

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    So, the difference between

    Lo he hecho ayer ~ Lo hice ayer
    Lo he hecho hoy ~ Lo hice hoy
    Ya me lo has dicho ~ Ya me lo dijiste


    is more stylistic than strictly grammatical,
    by using the present simple, many consider it more distant from the present.
    Well, the first and second sentences don't sound natural to me, so I can't tell the difference, but in the third one it could be what you said and also a question of ya me lo has dicho (once or more times, no matter when) versus ya me lo dijiste (thinking of the particular moment in the past when you told me that)

    Also, the difference is neutralized with the subjunctive for most peninsular speakers:
    Espero que lo hayan echo ayer/hoy.

    I wouldn't say that. Most people in Spain seem to differentiate espero que lo hayan hecho hoy from espero que lo hicieran ayer. Espero que lo hayan hecho ayer doesn't sound any better than sé lo has hecho ayer, at least not for me.

    I don't really trust 100% people on this forum, because many people are ashamed to accept that they use X or Y.
    Maybe they should record their informal speech. :) Many times, we don't think we ever use a certain form.
    But we do.
    So, you say, no people in Spain use the present perfect with ayer.
    But, it's pretty frequent in movies, songs and real speech (even writing on the internet) from people from Central and Northern Spain, and some parts of Southern America.
    I'm not from that part of Spain, so I'm pretty confident that I do not use the perfect in that way.
     

    Bark

    Senior Member
    Español de España
    En cuanto a entradas en Google (sólo en páginas de España):

    Lo he hecho ayer: 25.700
    Lo hice ayer: 396.000

    Un saludo,

    Bark
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    Yo creo que ese uso es el llamado antepresente.

    En el español de la mayoría de la península lo que se ve muy cercano aunque perfectamente terminado, se dice en pretérito perfecto.

    ¿Dónde has estado estas vacaciones? , o sea, las últimas, pero
    ¿Hace diez años, dónde estuviste de vacaciones?

    ¿Qué has hecho este puente?, o sea el último puente
    ¿Qué hiciste el puente de la Inmaculada?, hace ya tiempo.
    Completamente de acuerdo.

    Depende de eso y del carácter que se le quiera dar a lo que se está narrando. Si se quiere presentar los hechos con dinamismo, como si se estuvieran casi presenciando, tendemos a usar el pretérito perfecto. Si, en cambio, se quieren presentar de una manera más aséptica/descriptiva/enumerativa, tendemos a usar el pretérito indefinido.
     

    inib

    Senior Member
    British English
    En cuanto a entradas en Google (sólo en páginas de España):

    Lo he hecho ayer: 25.700
    Lo hice ayer: 396.000

    Un saludo,

    Bark
    Bark, no he querido intervenir hasta ahora, porque no soy nativa y desconozco muchas zonas de España, por no hablar de otros países hispanoparlantes. Pero creo que la estadística de Google sirve para poco, ya que Istriano estaba preguntando por un fenómeno que le había llamado la atención precisamente por no seguir la norma.
    EDIT:
    Bueno, pensándolo bien, Google no es un foro de idiomas, así que sí, a lo mejor da una idea de los porcentajes, y él quería saber la extensión del uso.
     

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Language is not mathematics,
    Alex Ubago canta: Hoy te perdí una vez mas al despertar ;)

    It's extremely common to hear the past simple with Hoy and Ya, even in Madrid and Castille,
    and not only in Canarias, Galicia, Asturias, León (where the past simple is universal for most past actions).
    I wouldn't use the simple past with hoy, but I have no problem with ya. Anyway, I'm not sure where are you getting at with this thread. It seems that a phrase like ayer lo he hecho is used by some people in Northern and Central Spain, language is not like mathematics indeed, but it's by no means standard or common in the whole country, not even in Madrid. That's at least my perception.
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    Dudar es saber. :)

    It's easy to say: hoy and ya are used with the present perfect, and ayer with the past simple tense.
    But, when you arrive in Madrid, and you hear hoy and ya with the past simple too, and ayer with the present perfect too,
    wouldn't be natural to feel there's something fishy about these grammar rules. :)

    And then you open the newest RAE grammar, and there's that thing called stylistics, which makes everything even less clear.
    Or more complicated, or more interesting.
    The boundaries between the tenses suddenly become less strict, with some overlapping usage appearing here, and there,
    not in all speakers, and not every time. :)
    That's the point, Istriano. In Spanish, the use of those tenses is not only less strict, but not strict at all. It depends a lot on the tone you want to give to your narration, the way you feel affected by the past acts:

    Estas últimas semanas he estado ocupadísimo preparando la mudanza (I finished all the preparations, but I still feel kind of overwhelmed or I feel that I've just finished the action)

    Estas últimas semanas estuve ocupadísimo preparando la mudanza (fortunately, I finished that annoying task)

    Nevertheless, I have to disagree with Ronald Ernest Batchelor and Christopher J. Pountain about the past tense we use with ayer. Right now, I can't think of any "normal" example with the present perfect that sounds natural to me (and I am from Madrid, too). Maybe I would use it in a context such as the following:

    - ¿Cuándo vas a hacer la matrícula? Al final se te va a pasar el plazo
    - Qué pesada te pones con ese tema. Ya la he hecho, déjame en paz.
    - ¿Ah, sí? ¿Y cuándo la has hecho, si puede saberse?
    - Ayer, la he hecho ayer

    Note that here, the use of te present perfect is kind of emphatic, mimicing the structure of the other speaker. In a normal situation, however, the first thing that would come to my mind would be "ayer, la hice ayer".
     

    _SantiWR_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    En cuanto a entradas en Google (sólo en páginas de España):

    Lo he hecho ayer: 25.700
    Lo hice ayer: 396.000

    Un saludo,

    Bark
    I got this:

    Lo he hecho ayer (site:.es): About 4,420 results
    Lo hice ayer (site:.es):49,900 results

    So the ratio is 11/1, and that without considering that quite a few of the 'he hecho' results seem to be false positives.
     

    Lurrezko

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) / Catalan
    Nevertheless, I have to disagree with Ronald Ernest Batchelor and Christopher J. Pountain about the past tense we use with ayer. Right now, I can't think of any "normal" example with the present perfect that sounds natural to me (and I am from Madrid, too). Maybe I would use it in a context such as the following:

    - ¿Cuándo vas a hacer la matrícula? Al final se te va a pasar el plazo
    - Qué pesada te pones con ese tema. Ya la he hecho, déjame en paz.
    - ¿Ah, sí? ¿Y cuándo la has hecho, si puede saberse?
    - Ayer, la he hecho ayer

    Note that here, the use of te present perfect is kind of emphatic, mimicing the structure of the other speaker. In a normal situation, however, the first thing that would come to my mind would be "ayer, la hice ayer".
    A beautiful example. :)
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Otro ejemplo madrileño vivo y actual (de hoy) para este hilo:
    Hemos relanzado los talleres de ...... ONG. Ayer hemos comenzado una nueva etapa llena de ilusión, energía y amor y con muchos más participantes....
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top