loaded with bull

Kozue

Senior Member
French
Bonjour,

Comment peut-on traduire l'expression "loaded with bull" dans cette citation extraite d'un article sur le débarquement du 6 juin 1944 :

"Eisenhower came and gave us the once over. He was a bright and breezy person but loaded with bull"

Un grand merci pour vos suggestions.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Deux possibilités pour "bull", un mot d'argot militaire :

    Bull = bullshit (paroles en l'air). Il était plein de conneries - il disait plein de bêtises - il se foutait de notre gueule...
    Bull = spit and polish (médailles et galons astiqués). Il était très axé sur le briquage - il était chargé de galons - il était très sapé...

    Honnêtement il m'est impossible de juger entre les deux. Connaître la nationalité de l'auteur pourrait peut-être nous aider.
     

    Soleil_Couchant

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hmm, I would definitely say it's the first, the "bullshit" meaning. I've never heard of the second one (spit and polish? what does that even mean?) So to me, the phrase means while Eisenhower was nice and breezy, he was full of crap....he said good things but they were not grounded in truth or reality; they just sounded good. empty promises, that kind of thing. But it was just bullshit.
     
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    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    Je suis allée regarder si Eisenhower portait beaucoup de médailles/galons, m'attendant à ce que ce soit oui, mais pas du tout, au contraire...
     

    Kozue

    Senior Member
    French
    L'auteur de ses mots est un soldat anglais qui se souvient de la visite d'Eisenhower avant le débarquement :
    "The soldiers who would land on D-Day had a different perspective on briefings and speeches. Private Mason of the 2nd Battalion East Yorks remembered when ‘Eisenhower came and gave us the once over. He was a bright and breezy person but loaded with bull."
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ... I've never heard of the second one (spit and polish? what does that even mean?) ...
    I've told you what it means - it's BE slang for "the-sergeant-tells-you-to-spit-on-your-buttons-and-polish-them", i.e. excessive army ritual. But I guessed that an American might not understand it, that's why I asked Kozue to tell us the nationality of the writer. There was more than one nationality involved in the D-Day landings, I seem to remember...

    [Cross-posted with Kozue's reply.] So we're no further advanced. But bull in the sense of bullshit speech wasn't very common in Britain at that time, so I'm slightly inclined to the second meaning - perhaps even if Eisenhower wasn't literally loaded with shiny medals, he may have been surrounded with well-scrubbed officers in smart uniforms, riding in a clean car with a flag on it...? The jury is still out, I'm afraid.
     
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    Soleil_Couchant

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think if we knew what perspective preceded this soldier's comment, that might help too. Because the author uses this soldier's quote to show a different perspective from what was just said. So I think knowing what was just said would help. For example, if it talks about how genuine and sincere Eisenhower is, I still think it could mean "bull" as in "bullshit." But if it talks about him being a really great hardcore roughin' it military person, the "bull" as in polish might make more sense.

    For what it's worth, I saw some etymology that said "bull" as in "bullshit" increased during WWII. It might have been more with American soldiers but, as you pointed out, since they were both there, maybe they borrowed some slang from each other?

    I'm not trying to fight for "bullshit" but I'm not 100% convinced either way yet.
     
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    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    I don't know if this is helpful:

    "His pre-existing public support made it unnecessary for him to sell himself, his hidden-hand leadership style reduced his interest in public persuasion, and, to top it off, he was an earnest, but uninspiring, speaker." (historynewsnetwork.org)
     

    Kozue

    Senior Member
    French
    Merci pour vos suggestions. Voici le paragraphe qui précède la citation du soldat Anglais :

    "Rear Admiral Morton L Deyo of the US Navy recalled that the Supreme Commander’s smile and confidence was worth an extra 20 divisions. ‘That day it was worth more. He spoke for ten minutes. Before the warmth of his quiet confidence, the mists of doubt dissolved. Not often has one man been called upon to accept so great a burden of responsibility. But here was one at peace with his soul.’
    The soldiers who would land on D-Day had a different perspective on briefings and speeches. Private Mason of the 2nd Battalion East Yorks remembered when ‘Eisenhower came and gave us the once over. He was a bright and breezy person but loaded with bull."
     
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