loathe to take vs loathe taking

< Previous | Next >

jj88

Senior Member
English, US
Hi, i'm just a bit confused as to what should come after loathe:

The one thing that I would loathe to take from the college experience is a parochial mindset.

or

The one thing that I would loathe taking from the college experience is a parochial mindset.
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    jj88 said:
    Hi, i'm just a bit confused as to what should come after loathe:

    The one thing that I would loathe to take from the college experience is a parochial mindset.

    or

    The one thing that I would loathe taking from the college experience is a parochial mindset.
    Since you are using "loathe" to mean "hate" here, I would suggest "loathe to take."

    But "loathe" doesn't sit well with me in this sentence; it sounds too strong somehow. How about "despise" or "resent"

    The one thing I would despise/resent taking...
    (for some reason, "taking" sounds better with "despise" or "resent")
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Well-spotted, river:thumbsup:
    Maybe jj88 means to say:
    The one thing that I would be loath to take from the college experience is a parochial mindset.
    The meaning is very different.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    The expression I think is echoing around here is "to be loath to..."

    I'd as lief (very archaic, Shakespearean), meaning I'd just as soon.

    I'm loathe (averse, unwilling-- not "I'd hate") to...

    I'd rather... which we still use.

    Kind of a hat-trick of comparative expressions about preference.

    edit:
    Fie! The orang outflanketh the fox.
    .
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top