Located in vs located at

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kritika

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Hi,

I am confused when to use located in and when to use located at.

Is it acceptible to say located at 'city name/country name'.

Please help.

Thanks,
Kannu
 
  • kritika

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    So, over the phone if someone asks me 'where are you located?'
    The answer should be 'I am located in Australia' and not 'I am located at Australia'
    Is that right?

    Is there any exception where we can use at with a city /state or country name.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Yes, that is correct. You never use "at" with a country, city, state, town, village, hamlet, province, region, area, county.
    I'm not sure that these exclusions are always correct. For a start, we need context and specific examples. I would almost certainly use 'located in' for a larger area, such as a country or state or province, but I suspect that there are cases in which 'located at' would be idiomatic for a smaller sub-division.

    Located at is routinely used for street address, as well as for general descriptive terms such as "the south side of..." or "at the back of...". There are numerous web pages that use "located at" with village names in both Pakistani and Indian English.
    I did a web search for "located at Newcastle", as the hamlet I live in belongs to the tiny Town of Newcastle. Not surprisingly, most of the results were for a much larger Newcastle, in England.

    Newcastle Upon Tyne Hotels

    The hotel is located at Newcastle upon Tyne NE6 1DH, Walker Road. The ideal establishment to stay during your visit, City Apartments Newcastle Quayside is ...
    www.hotel-d.com/en/.../newcastle-upon-tyne-hotels.html - Cached

    Visitors' Information - Directions

    The station building at Ballynahinch Junction was unusual because it was originally located at Newcastle. At one time it was hoped that the line could be ...
    www.downrail.co.uk/directions.htm - Cached
     
    Last edited:

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Located at is routinely used for street address, as well as for general descriptive terms such as "the south side of..." or "at the back of...". There are numerous web pages that use "located at" with village names in both Pakistani and Indian English.
    OK, so I recant:

    You never use "at" with a country, city, state, town, village, hamlet, province, region, area, county in British English.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi bluegiraffe,

    Perhaps you don't, but while you were posting I was finding examples of located at <Town name> on British English web pages. I've added them to the post above yours.

    Here are a couple more:


    1. Print this Used 2009 Nissan Interstar 2.5dCi SWB Low Roof 2.8T SE ...

      This Nissan Interstar is used, and is located at Newcastle upon Tyne. For your reference, this van has the vanlocator ID of 27802. This Nissan Interstar has ...
      www.vanlocator.co.uk/buy-van-for-sale-print.php?van=27802... - Cached
    2. Print this Used 2006 Ford Transit Connect 1.8TDCi (110PS) T230 LWB ...

      This Ford Transit is used, and is located at Newcastle upon Tyne. For your reference, this van has the vanlocator ID of 24876. ...
      www.vanlocator.co.uk/buy-van-for-sale-print.php?van=24876... - Cached

    Invisible Dental Braces: Welland Vale Road Dental Surgery in Corby

    Our clinic, located at Corby is a beautiful modern facility sure to please your eyes and sooth your mind. Each consultation begins with a private interview ...
    www.dentalsurgerycorby.co.uk/invisibledentalbracescorby.html - Cached

    Corner Stone Lettings - Particulars

    Located at Southwell on main routes, buses run every 7 to 8 minutes to Weymouth. The property is close to local pubs and schools. This is five minutes from ...
    www.cornerstonelettings.co.uk/site/go/viewParticulars?propertyID... - Cached
     
    Last edited:

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I wont go into what I think of taking random examples from the web as I've stated it so many times on this forum. They don't sound right. I'd say they're wrong.
    You need to correct your city government:

    REGISTRATION SERVICE AD HOC SELECT COMMITTEE

    The Basford Register Office is located at Bulwell. This is within the Nottingham City Council boundary and has previously ...
    itsacr02a.nottscc.gov.uk/apps/.../r06_reg%20ad%20hoc%20appendix.pdf

    clients - Architectural Certification - Arnold Design

    Residential Care and Nursing homes completed are located at Arnold, Aspley, Beeston, Bestwood, Hucknall, Mansfield, Burton on Trent, Stoke on Trent and ...
    www.arnolddesign.co.uk/Clients.htm - Cached
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You need to correct your city government:

    REGISTRATION SERVICE AD HOC SELECT COMMITTEE

    The Basford Register Office is located at Bulwell. This is within the Nottingham City Council boundary and has previously ...
    itsacr02a.nottscc.gov.uk/apps/.../r06_reg%20ad%20hoc%20appendix.pdf

    clients - Architectural Certification - Arnold Design

    Residential Care and Nursing homes completed are located at Arnold, Aspley, Beeston, Bestwood, Hucknall, Mansfield, Burton on Trent, Stoke on Trent and ...
    www.arnolddesign.co.uk/Clients.htm - Cached
    The second one is not part of my City Council (we don't have City Governments) and actually I used to work there and don't think much of the standard of English used. They don't select only excellent English speakers to work at the City Council.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    For a start, let me say that I tend to agree with your stylistic preference. I use "in" for town and city names, and "at" for more precise, typically smaller locations. That said,
    I don't think that there is a "rule" of grammar that forces the choice in the same black and white way you have described. At is used with town and village names, whether you and I like the sound of it or not.

    In older English writing, both BE and AE, the use of at with a city or town name was far from uncommon. For example...

    In 1776, Johnson and Boswell stopped at Birmingham, on their way to Lichfield. "It gave me pleasure," says the latter, " to observe the joy which the Doctor and Mr. Hector expressed on seeing each other again." In the autumn of 1781, Johnson again visited Birmingham and Lichfield.
    Graphic illustrations of the life and times of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

    Charles John Smith, London, 1837


    The "located at" pattern is still found in current writing. It usually sounds clunky to me, but not always.

    Computer assisted and open access education‎ - Page 139

    Fred Percival, Ray Land, Denis Edgar-Nevill, Association for Educational and Training Technology. International Conference - Computers - 1995 - 323 pages
    ... University are members of the UK Mathematics Courseware Consortium which ...
    more than 30 UK universities with principal sites located at Birmingham, ...
     

    marrino89

    New Member
    italiano
    Hi mi name is Stefano...

    I have a doubt about located in or at... saying "Island is located at/it south of Greenland", do I use "at".. isn't it?

    Thank you
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi mi name is Stefano...

    I have a doubt about located in or at... saying "Island is located at/it south of Greenland", do I use "at".. isn't it?
    You would say "The island is located to the south of Greenland."

    Welcome to the forum. :)

    If you put words or phrases in the Search box at the top of the page, you'll find any previous threads below the dictionary definitions. In this case, I type in in the north and found these:

    'in/to' the north of ....
    <in/on> the North of country
    "to the north & in the north"
    in the north of/to Tokyo
    in the north or in north?
    in the west, in the north
    In/at/to/on the north of Taiwan
     

    marrino89

    New Member
    italiano
    Thank you for the welcome Copyright :)
    I tried to search in some previous thread but I couldn't find any good answer to my question.
    Thank you for the answer :)
     

    _Husby_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain / Catalan
    What if we were talking about a sea?

    -Barcelona is located on the Mediterranean sea?
    -Barcelona is located at the Mediterranean sea?

    On the Internet, I've found the first one as related to Barcelona. However, I've also found at being used in Wikipedia's article about Algiers.

    I'd be grateful if I could read opinions from both main English dialects' speakers.
     

    _Husby_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain / Catalan
    I'd definitely say that it's on the Mediterranean. And New York City, where I live, is on the east coast of the US.
    Thank you for your reply.

    Would you then say: I've bought a house on the coast instead of I've bought a house at the coast?
     

    _Husby_

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain / Catalan
    Thank you both :)

    I'm curious though about British English. Do they also use the preposition on in these cases? I mean, I'm no native but I would have used at in both sentences... Any Brit in the house?
     

    sarasti

    New Member
    English
    Could you say -

    Located at the center of the Western Hemisphere?

    or would you use...

    Located in the center of the Western Hemisphere?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Located at the center of the Western Hemisphere?

    or would you use...

    Located in the center of the Western Hemisphere?
    I would say "at" specifies the location more precisely than "in", but you could in fact use either there.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Welcome to the forum, sarasti.

    Please note that we continually ask for complete sentences and context here, lest we be forced to speculate with poor information that frequently results therefrom.

    Strictly speaking, the geographical center of something is a point. I (and, I'll wager everyone else here) learned in secondary school geometry that a point has no dimensions and as such, one cannot be in something with no dimensions.

    .... or did you mean something else?

    Context is everything. :)
     
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