lock and ring

Taylor125

Member
USA
English
I'm seeking the French term for "lock and ring", when a chordlignss up perfectly producing overtones. None of the French words for "lock" seem right. "Accroche et son"? "Align et son"?
Merci!
 
  • Michelvar

    Quasimodo
    French / France
    Hi,

    Here we find a translation for "the ringing chord", which seems to translates as " l'accord sonnant".

    So if you don't find any translation for "lock and ring" (I didn't), you can use something like "lorsque les voix atteingnent l'accord sonnant".
     

    LeQi

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    I used to be a professional musician, and I'm not aware of any real translation. You shouldn't take my word for it, of course ;-) If you find something, I'd be interested to hear it.
    If I had to talk about this in French, I would make a full sentence, involving the overtones and the emergence of a new voice. And the specific sentence would depend on the context. For your translation, I suppose I would keep the English term and add an explanation in brackets or something...

    I'm not too convinced by "Accord sonnant" (with all due respect Michelvar ;-) particularly because as far as I know, the 'ring' is not really a factor of the chord itself, but rather of the produced overtones. But again, I may be wrong !
    You may want to look up specific styles of vocal polyphony (Sardinia or Corsica for instance) to see what comes up, but these usually have their own vocabulary too, so...
     

    Taylor125

    Member
    USA
    English
    First of all, damn that autocorrect! Chordlignss was supposed to be "chord lines up". LeQi is correct, the "ring" refers to overtones, which are notes heard which aren't actually sung. They are produced when the voices produce a chord that "locks" because everyone's vocal production is in total unity. Peut-être "ton sous-entendu" ou "ton haut-entendu"?
    Merci!
     

    Marie So

    Senior Member
    French. France.
    If it's a noun you're looking for, isn't it what we call "harmoniques"? I may have misunderstood what you really meant, though.
     
    Top