Lockhart was blasted off his feet:

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nguyen dung

Senior Member
Vietnamese
In "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" of J.K Rowlling there is sentence:

Both of them swung their wands above their heads and pointed them attheir opponent; Snape cried: “Expelliarmus!” There was a dazzling flash of scarlet light and Lockhart was blasted off his feet: He flew backward off the stage, smashed into the wall, and slid down it to sprawl on the floor.

Does bolded clause mean"Lockhart was taking off" or mean "there was an explosion at his feet"?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    No. The following sentence tells you more about what happened.

    The bold just says this:

    "Lockhart was standing on his feet. Then there was a blast. As a result of the blast, he was no longer standing on his feet."
     
    In "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" of J.K Rowlling there is sentence:

    Both of them swung their wands above their heads and pointed them attheir opponent; Snape cried: “Expelliarmus!” There was a dazzling flash of scarlet light and Lockhart was blasted off his feet: He flew backward off the stage, smashed into the wall, and slid down it to sprawl on the floor.

    Does bolded clause mean"Lockhart was taking off" or mean "there was an explosion at his feet"?
    It's like an explosion just in front of him, a blast that knocks him backward, then hitting the wall and down.
     
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