login/log-in + use as adjective

CMST

Member
English - American
Does anyone use log-in rather than login (as a noun) or has the hyphen fallen by the wayside? Also, can either one of these be used as an adjective? Example: "How many login accounts are there for this machine?" Or do I just need to say, "How many logins are there?" or "How many user accounts are there?" ?

I'm working on a computer access document for this and I would like to say this in the most correct way!

Thank you for all suggestions.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This is an area in flux, and correctness is yet to be "established". It was originally correct to use log in as two words, no hyphen. "Please log in to your account." Then came "please log-in to your account" and "please login to your account". I would consider those incorrect - there's no need to change the original . However, the verb obviously has been nouned and the noun can be either log-in or login.

    You didn't ask about logging on, so that's for a separate thread :)
     

    CMST

    Member
    English - American
    This is an area in flux, and correctness is yet to be "established". It was originally correct to use log in as two words, no hyphen. "Please log in to your account." Then came "please log-in to your account" and "please login to your account". I would consider those incorrect - there's no need to change the original . However, the verb obviously has been nouned and the noun can be either log-in or login.

    You didn't ask about logging on, so that's for a separate thread :)
    Thank you for that helpful information. Could you also be address the issue of using login as an adjective (such as, "your login account") or does this need to be only "your user account". Thanks very much!!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you for that helpful information. Could you also be address the issue of using login as an adjective (such as, "your login account") or does this need to be only "your user account". Thanks very much!!
    It follows the normal pattern of using a noun as an adjective "the book cover", "the door panel" "the savings account" etc. Once you decide on the noun form, you have the adjective :D "login prompt, login shell, login script, login account" etc
     

    CMST

    Member
    English - American
    It follows the normal pattern of using a noun as an adjective "the book cover", "the door panel" "the savings account" etc. Once you decide on the noun form, you have the adjective :D "login prompt, login shell, login script, login account" etc
     

    CMST

    Member
    English - American
    Thank you for both answers. The laboratory I'm working for employs "login" and "user account" as synonyms. I'm glad to know that I can say "login account" . (P.S. 40 years ago? It seems like computers were not very mainstream at that time!) Many thanks for your answers!
     
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