Long grass

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Oros

Senior Member
Korean
He spoke out after Mr Straw issued an official statement while on a visit to Washington last Wednesday, in which he called for an independent international inquiry into the killings in the eastern city of Andizhan on May 13. The statement described the shootings as "appalling" but avoided pinning blame on Islam Karimov, the hardline president accused of ordering troops to open fire.



Nor did it call for the Uzbek authorities to ease tensions by holding fresh elections, despite reports by electoral monitors that a poll last December was rigged in favour of Mr Karimov.

Mr Murray told The Sunday Telegraph: "If Britain was really serious about encouraging reform in Uzbekistan, it would be calling for new elections. All it is doing is issuing pious hypocrisies instead.

"Calling for a public inquiry is also just a way of kicking the whole thing into the long grass. There are numerous people I know out there who I consider reliable witnesses, who say that government troops opened fire on demonstrators."

Mr Murray believes he was removed from his post as ambassador because he publicly accused the British and US intelligence agencies of using information allegedly obtained through torture by Uzbek security services.
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What is the meaning of the following sentence?

Calling for a public inquiry is also just a way of kicking the whole thing into the long grass.

I haven't heard about the words 'long grass'. I know what it implies in this context; put the whole issue in a meaningless position.

What is the origin of the words 'long grass'? What is long grass?
 
  • leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    What is the meaning of the following sentence?

    Calling for a public inquiry is also just a way of kicking the whole thing into the long grass.
    I also interpret it as hiding something. But calling for a public hearing is usually not the way you would hide someting. :)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    leenico said:
    I also interpret it as hiding something. But calling for a public hearing is usually not the way you would hide someting. :)
    However, by kicking something into the tall grass of a long-winded public (!)
    investigation, all immediate attention is deflected. There will be 'answers' after a while, when the commission has completed its good work. In the meantime, pay attention to Manchester United, or the NBA championship games if you prefer.

    Turning things over to an investigative commission is a good way to guarantee that nothing will get done. Eventually a report will be issued.
    Ho hum.
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    cuchuflete said:
    However, by kicking something into the tall grass of a long-winded public (!)
    investigation, all immediate attention is deflected. There will be 'answers' after a while, when the commission has completed its good work. In the meantime, pay attention to Manchester United, or the NBA championship games if you prefer.

    Turning things over to an investigative commission is a good way to guarantee that nothing will get done. Eventually a report will be issued.
    Ho hum.
    Someone once told me that the best fishing is in murky waters. In that sense you are correct because the more that people get involved the more pros & cons will emerge and the real truth becomes hidden.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    cuchuflete said:
    However, by kicking something into the tall grass of a long-winded public (!)
    investigation, all immediate attention is deflected. There will be 'answers' after a while, when the commission has completed its good work.
    Turning things over to an investigative commission is a good way to guarantee that nothing will get done. Eventually a report will be issued.
    Ho hum.
    Exactly!!
    they will question..and argue the facts and figures... until people forget...and then put out a report that says..nothing...
    It is done here all the time..

    tg;)
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    garryknight said the following:
    Long grass is a great place to hide things.

    How do I find it on a dictionary or some other source?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Oros said:
    garryknight said the following:
    Long grass is a great place to hide things.

    How do I find it on a dictionary or some other source?
    Hello Oros,

    This kind of question comes up frequently in the other language forums.

    As I result, I have searched for good mono-lingual ad multi-lingual web sites about proverbs, sayings, aphorisms, refranes, and the like. These can be quite helpful.

    Another course is to type, in the most popular search engine, "define" + (term you are seeking, in quotes). Yet another is to type "etymology" plus the word or phrase.

    While all of these are helpful, the one that is the most ejoyable is the one you have already mastered: open a thread.

    regards,
    Cuchu
     

    PSIONMAN

    Senior Member
    Br English
    Oros said:
    garryknight said the following:
    Long grass is a great place to hide things.

    How do I find it on a dictionary or some other source?
    I found this through Google - usingenglish(dot)com

    Go to the idioms page

    Hope it helps, lots of idioms here :)

    Jeff
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    cuchuflete said:
    Another course is to type, in the most popular search engine, "define" + (term you are seeking, in quotes).
    You need to specifically do it in the following way:
    define:"long grass"
    In other words, with a colon after "define", then no spaces, then the word you want defined, or the phrase in quotes that you want defined. And by the way, Google doesn't have a definition for "long grass".
     
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