Long/short position in stocks

SoccerEconomist

New Member
American/Texan English
Hello all,

What would be the best way to translate the terms "long" and "short" or "long position" and "short position" as they have to do with the stock market such as in the following sentence:?

I'm long (have a long position) on oil companies right now since the price of gas continues to rise, but short(have a short position) on building companies because of the housing crisis.

Investopedia defines "long" as:

1. The buying of a security such as a stock, commodity or currency, with the expectation that the asset will rise in value.
Opposite of "short" (or short position).

and "short" as:

1. The sale of a borrowed security, commodity or currency with the expectation that the asset will fall in value.
Opposite of "long (or long position)".

From my own searching, I've come upon Hausse-Position and Baisse-Position as well as simply the English Long-Position and Short-Position. Any recommendations?

Many thanks!
 
  • Robocop

    Senior Member
    (Swiss) German
    As far as I know, there is no German translation of the terms "short" and "long" in the terminology of stock markets. Search the web for +long +short and restrict to pages in German, it will show you.
     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    I'm long (have a long position) on oil companies right now since the price of gas continues to rise, but short(have a short position) on building companies because of the housing crisis.
    Man könnte den Sinn dieser Aussage evt. so umschreibend wiedergeben:
    Ich habe in meinem Portefeuille bei Ölfirmen zugelegt, weil der Gaspreis weiterhin steigt, aber Hoch- und Tiefbauwerte habe ich wegen der Krise auf dem Wohnbaumarkt leerverkauft.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Investopedia defines "long" as:

    1. The buying of a security such as a stock, commodity or currency, with the expectation that the asset will rise in value.
    Opposite of "short" (or short position).

    and "short" as:

    1. The sale of a borrowed security, commodity or currency with the expectation that the asset will fall in value.
    Opposite of "long (or long position)".

    From my own searching, I've come upon Hausse-Position and Baisse-Position as well as simply the English Long-Position and Short-Position. Any recommendations?
    Hausse and Baisse is correct - it is used in stock market speech, people on the street usually wouldn't make much sense of it.
    Also Wiki lists 'Bullen- und Bärenmarkt' - terms which I haven't come across so far and which do not necessarily refer to the term of long and short sales.


    This 'long' and 'short' selling business is about future markets - and futures would be translated as 'Termingeschäfte' or - in the case of goods and not other assets - 'Warentermingeschäfte'; also the English term 'Future' is used nowadays untranslated in German.

    If you are 'buying long' = 'auf eine Hausse spekulieren' then you buy today with a date set e. g. 3 months in the future and hope for the price to rise because when the contract has to be fulfilled in 3 months time you will have to sell the same amount of stock - and if the price not rises, or even falls, then you are making a loss.
    'Selling short' = 'auf eine Baisse spekulieren' is the contrary, you sell now assets you don't have and hope for prices falling so that you can 'buy back' your stock at a lower price.

    For selling short Wiki also lists 'Leerverkauf', and for selling long there also seems to be the English term 'Long' used already in German. I am not familiar with both these terms, so I really can't say what would be mainly used nowadays on the stock market - and probably there would even be different preferences of choice of words if you compare e. g. the stock market of Frankfurt to the one of Vienna.
     
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