Longest word

< Previous | Next >

Whodunit

Senior Member
Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
If I'm not mistaken, it's the diminutive and the plural, respectively.
Does it make sense to say kameraadschappelijkheidjes? In German, it would be nonsense to add the diminutive particle to a word ending in "-keit." There may be exceptions, though.

In Chinese, the word with the most number of strokes is made of 4

eg.

龍龍
龍龍

It refers to a person who "says so little with so much words".

That's 64 strokes altogether. I personally think it is humanly impossible to write in a normal size text.
Do Chinese natives know that "word" (let me call it that way) by rote? :)
 
  • Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Russian: «рентгеноэлектрокардиографического» - 33 leters ... they say this word is recorded in the Guiness book, as thee longest Russian word.
    ("x-ray - electro - cardio - graphical" adj.)
     

    Staarkali

    Senior Member
    Another nicely complicated "character" :

    梆梆面 biángbiángmiàn : Biang biang noodle (Shaanxi cuisine)

    As every complicated character, we can't input it (or we would have a full black square), so I put here an external link with a picture on it;
    http://www.xtour.cn/2004-9/2004929153626.htm


    Only 56 strokes but I prefer this one since its not just a smaller character repeated 3 or 4 times ;)
     

    jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    Does it make sense to say kameraadschappelijkheidjes? In German, it would be nonsense to add the diminutive particle to a word ending in "-keit." There may be exceptions, though.
    Well, I suppose it could be used to sort of take the mickey - in general -heid's probably aren't used that much in diminutive. (Although at least Belgians do seem to have a taste for diminutives, in the most curious places :p)
     

    ((((((((((ASLAN))))))))))

    New Member
    Turkey-Turkish
    THE LONGEST WORD(not the word having longest meaning) ON EARTH IS A TURKISH WORD

    According to the 'The Guinness Book of World Records' the longest unbroken word/sentence in the known world is Turkish:

    Çekoslovakyalılaştırabilemediklerimizlerdenmisiniz?

    a 50-letter word/sentence containing 12 suffixes that means: 'Are you in the group of persons that we couldn't Czechoslovakianize?'
     

    samanthalee

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, English - [Singapore]
    Do Chinese natives know that "word" (let me call it that way) by rote? :)
    You mean how we remember all those 64 strokes?

    It's a bit like Lego. The word is made up of 4 which means "Dragon". We just learn how to write "Dragon" by rote, then we can write 4 "Dragons" stacked on top of one another to form this word.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No background, made up just for fun. In other words, there's no such word.

    Others include:
    • Afyonkarahisarlılaştıramadıklarımızdan mısınız? or even;
    • Telekominikasyonlaştıramadıklarımızdan mısınız?
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    ....And thus you got the longest word in the world. In other words, your Guinness Book's record was actually faked! :D
    What I mean is that one would not hear/say this word unless the topic is "the longest word." I don't think this word has broken a record in Guinness, actually. :)

    Çekoslovakyalılaştırabilemediklerimizlerden misiniz?
    The last seven letters should be written as a separate word.

    Thanks to Turkish suffixes, there's even a longer word/sentence (77 letters)
    "Muvaffakiyetsizleştiricileştiriveremeyebileceklerimizdenmişsinizcesineymişmiş."
     

    Eáránë

    Member
    Belgium, Dutch (Flemish)
    Hello,

    I know quite a long word in Dutch (but I don't know if it's the longest word). It certainly has a lot of T's!

    Hottentottententententoonstellingen
    (Hottentotten-tenten-tentoonstellingen)

    It refers to exhibitions where tents of the Hottentots (an African tribe) are displayed.

    Eáránë
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Gelenekselleştiriveremeyebileceklerdenseler (15 E's)
    Sıkıntısızlaştırıcılığınızın (11 I's)
    Kişiliksizleştiricileştiriverebileceklerimizdenmişsiniz (15 İ's)
    Badanalayamayacaklardansalar (12 A's)

    :D
     

    PocketWatch

    Member
    USA English
    The 1185 letter word is quite impressive. The longest English word that I can spell by memory is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, a lung disease from volcanic air.
     

    youtin

    Senior Member
    Filipino, Philippines
    Another nicely complicated "character" :

    梆梆面 biángbiángmiàn : Biang biang noodle (Shaanxi cuisine)

    As every complicated character, we can't input it (or we would have a full black square), so I put here an external link with a picture on it;
    http://www.xtour.cn/2004-9/2004929153626.htm


    Only 56 strokes but I prefer this one since its not just a smaller character repeated 3 or 4 times ;)
    I cant believe how many radicals there are in the first two characters O_O LOL..

    Is it still being written that way? Or has it given way to the easier, simpler way of writing?

    +++++++++

    In Tagalog :

    there's nagsisipagsinungalisinungalingan which has 32 letters and means "pretending to tell a lie" but I don't know if it's the longest word ^^; Or even if it really is a word, though it somehow makes sense.
     
    THE LONGEST WORD(not the word having longest meaning) ON EARTH IS A TURKISH WORD

    According to the 'The Guinness Book of World Records' the longest unbroken word/sentence in the known world is Turkish:

    Çekoslovakyalılaştırabilemediklerimizlerdenmisiniz?

    a 50-letter word/sentence containing 12 suffixes that means: 'Are you in the group of persons that we couldn't Czechoslovakianize?'
    What about

    "Afyonkarahisarlılaştırabilemediklerimizdenmiymişsiniz?"

    which means "Are you in the group of persons that they say we couldn't Afyonkarahisarianize?"
    By the way, Afyonkarahisar is a city in Turkey. I think it is a 53 letter-word
     

    ((((((((((ASLAN))))))))))

    New Member
    Turkey-Turkish
    I got the mentioned longest unbroken Turkish word(Çekoslovakyalılaştırabilemediklerimizlerdenmisiniz?)
    from a reliable source( I want to give the source, however I cannot post the url here: it says "You are only allowed to post URLs to other sites after you have made 30 posts or more".), but it seems that now there are some other longer words such as;

    "Muvaffakiyetsizleştiricileştiriveremeyebileceklerimizdenmişsinizcesineymişmiş"

    which has been given here by Chazzwozzer before...;)

    However, this does not mean the fact that "Guinness Book of World Records"' having accepted the above stated word

    (Çekoslovakyalılaştırabilemediklerimizlerdenmisiniz?)

    as the world's longest unbroken word/sentence is a fabrication, rather it means SOME NEW LONGER WORDS(some new records) ARE AVAILABLE RIGHT NOW... YOU KNOW LANGUAGE PROCESS IS PRODUCTIVE AND NEW WORDS ARE PRODUCED CONTINUOUSLY IN MANY LANGUAGES...:)

    What about

    "Afyonkarahisarlılaştırabilemediklerimizdenmiymişsiniz?"

    which means "Are you in the group of persons that they say we couldn't Afyonkarahisarianize?"
    By the way, Afyonkarahisar is a city in Turkey. I think it is a 53 letter-word
    Yes, the word you have posted is longer than mine, but

    "Muvaffakiyetsizleştiricileştiriveremeyebileceklerimizdenmişsinizcesineymişmiş"

    which is another Turkish word seems to be the longest for now.;)
     

    المعتصم

    Member
    Arabic (palestinian)
    hello
    no one until now talked about arabic;
    so;
    the longest word in arabic without "dama'er"(add-ons) is :"استعمال" read "eti'mal" means: usage
    and others: استكتاب، استرجاع،...
    but the longest with "dama'er" is:"أسنستكتبكموهاه" read "asanastaktebkumuhah" means: "will we make you write his it?"

    :) looks complex, right?
    but it's not...
     

    astlanda

    Senior Member
    Estonian maamurre
    The same in Estonian as in German - you may add as many words as you please until it looks silly.
    If possible, don't do it.

    E.G. Elevandilondikondiüdipudipirukamüüjavarbavahe...

    A gap between toes of a smashed elephant trunk bone marrow pie seller ...
     

    elirlandes

    Senior Member
    Ireland English
    When I was in college, a few of the German guys used to have a laugh trying to see who could teach me how to pronounce the longest word they could make up - I still have no idea how to speak German, but have plenty of useless long words...

    It started because I noticed that one of them was applying for a loan under the Bundesausbildungsförderungsgesetz [33 letters] "Federal Law Pertaining to Grants for Education" or BAFöG for short.

    The winner, two years later following many long hard ours spent down the pub was:
    Oberdonaudampfschiffahrtgesellschaftsschiffskapitaensschirmmuetzeknopf [70 letters]
    The button from the peaked cap of a ship's captain from the Steamboat Company of the Upper Donau river.

     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    When I was in college, a few of the German guys used to have a laugh trying to see who could teach me how to pronounce the longest word they could make up - I still have no idea how to speak German, but have plenty of useless long words...

    It started because I noticed that one of them was applying for a loan under the Bundesausbildungsförderungsgesetz [33 letters] "Federal Law Pertaining to Grants for Education" or BAFöG for short.

    The winner, two years later following many long hard ours spent down the pub was:
    Oberdonaudampfschifffahrtgesellschaftsschiffskapitaensschirmmuetzenknopf [70 letters]
    The button from the peaked cap of a ship's captain from the Steamboat Company of the Upper Donau river.

    According to our new spelling rule "Schifffahrt" has 3 f´s
    You forgot the N in "Mützen"

    Technically you can form endless words in German (compound nouns).
    Most of them won´t be used in everyday language. But "Bundesausbildungsförderungsgesetz" is a good example for a "useful" long word.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Thread search tells me that the most famous Austrian long word hasn't been mentioned yet.

    It is a real world and goes like that:

    Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaft

    And it means: danube steam ship company. The company somehow survived and still exists - there are still ships with the abbreviation DDSG running on the Danube.
    So now the thing about the German language is that you can form compound nouns if you want to specify a noun: the captain of DDSG, for example, then would be:

    Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän

    (which is still, one could claim, a "real" word), and the key to his room on the ship would be:

    Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänskajütenschlüssel

    etc. etc.: you can go on like that infinitely. These however are not "real" words, not really used in everyday speech; as children however we played sometimes to form the longest correct word, like for example this one:

    Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänskajütenschlüsselbundanhängeraufbewahrungsschrank

    etc. etc.
     

    Wilma_Sweden

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Scania)
    Technically you can form endless words in German (compound nouns).
    Most of them won´t be used in everyday language.
    The same is true for Swedish. The longest Swedish compound word I've found is this one:
    Nordöstersjökustartilleriflygspaningssimulatoranläggningsmaterielunderhållsuppföljningssystemdiskussionsinläggsförberedelsearbeten
    (130 letters)(=preparatory work for discussion contributions about the follow-up system for the maintenance of flight surveillance simulator equipment belonging to the Northern Baltic Coastal artillery...) Phew!
    It's what you get when searching for the longest Swedish word on google, although it's rather 'laboured' so I'm sure it's merely a result of someone trying to create the longest compound possible. :D

    In terms of non-compounds, the longest one I could find is
    internationaliseringarnas (=internationalisation + suffixes for plural, definite form and genitive), or konstantinopolitanskornas (=female inhabitant of Constantinople + suffixes as above)
    Both have only 25 letters, so very modest when compared to Finnish, Hungarian or Turkish...

    /Wilma
     
    The longest Greek word ever, was constructed by Aristophanes and appears in his work Ecclesiazusae. It describes a food and contains 171 letters:
    Λαπαδοτεμαχοσελαχογαλεοκρανιολειψανοδριμυποτριμματοσιλφιολιπαρομελιτοκατακεχυμενοκιχλεπικοσσυφοφαττοπεριστεραλεκτρυονοπτοτιφαλλιοκιγκλοπελειολαγωοσιραιοβαφτητραγανοπτερύγων.
    The same word transliterated:
    Lopadotemakhoselakhogaleokranioleipsanodrimhypotrimmatosilphiokarabomelitokatakekhymenokikhlepikossyphophattoperisteralektryonoptokephalliokigklopeleiolagōiosiraiobaphētraganopterýgōn.
    According to Wiki "The dish was a fricassee, with at least 16 sweet and sour ingredients, including the following:

    * Fish slices
    * Fish of the Elasmobranchii subclass (a shark or ray)
    * Rotted dogfish or small shark's head
    * Generally sharp-tasting dish of several ingredients grated and pounded together
    * Silphion "laserwort," apparently a kind of giant fennel
    * A kind of crab, beetle, or crayfish
    * Honey poured down
    * Wrasse (or thrush)
    * Was topped with a kind of sea fish or Blackbird
    * Wood pigeon
    * Domestic pigeon
    * Chicken
    * Roasted head of dabchick
    * Hare, which could be a kind of bird or a kind of sea hare
    * New wine boiled down
    * Wing and/or fin
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    In Japanese:

    寿限無寿限無五劫の擦切海砂利水魚の水行末雲来末風来末食う寝るところに住むところ藪小路のぶら小路パイポパイポパイポのシューリンガンシューリンガンのグーリンダイグーリンダイのポンポコピーのポンポコナーの長久命の長助
    Jugemu Jugemu Gokō-no Surikire Kaijarisuigyo-no Suigyōmatsu Unraimatsu Fūraimatsu Kuunerutokoro-ni Sumutokoro Yaburakōji-no burakōji Paipopaipo Paipo-no-shūringan Shūringan-no Gūrindai Gūrindai-no Ponpokopī-no Ponpokonā-no Chōkyūmei-no Chōsuke (the transcription cited from Wikipedia)

    Any joke's on you, this is not my creation. :D
    This long word comes from the protagonist's name of Rakugo(落語, a Japanese folktale), you can see the meaning of each word on the attached wikipedia URL.
     

    ancalimon

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In Turkish the longest words are sentences. You can create sentences that do not normally exist but that are perfectly legit and there is no limit to how long a word can be this way.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    I exclude such terms like otorhinolaryngoložka (female otorhinolaryngolog) or riboflavinadenosindifosfát as non-Czech.

    The Czech longest word (probably):

    " nejneobhospodařovávatelnějšími ..." - 30 characters = [with] the most non-cultivable ...;

    hospodařiti, obhospodařovati = to farm, to cultivate, to manage, to administer;
    (Obhospodařuje 200 akrů. – He farms 200 acres.)
    obhospodařovávati = a frequentative/iterative/repetitive form of the previous verb;
    obhospodařovávatelný = cultivable; capable of undergoing cultivation; a thing that can be repeatedly cultivated;
    neobhospodařovávatelný = negation of the previous adjective;
    nejneobhospodařovávatelnější = superlative of the previous adjective;
    nejneobhospodařovávatelnějšími = + ending of the plur. instr. case;

    Can be replaced with the periphrastic superlative:

    "nejhůře obhospodařovávatelnými ..." = [with] the worst cultivable ..."
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    Unfortunately, we don't have a "longest word" in Chinese...no fun. :(
    The basic morpheme in Chinese is called "character". A character has one syllable and some specific meanings or connotations.
    A "word" typically contains 2 to 4 characters, at most 5.
    Any "word" longer than that can be separated into 2 or more "words". That's why we don't consider it as a word, but a phrase.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The two invented longest :eek: :D ;)
    place names and train stations in the UK are in Wales:

    Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
    Gorsafawddacha'idraigodanheddogleddoll�npenrhynareurdraethceredigio



    Wow!!!! What I don't know is that square :thumbsup: above!!! Which letter would that be???


    Kissies!!! :p
    Wow! A whole decade between this being asked and someone finally getting round to answering it. Is that a record...?

    Anyway, the missing letter is ô (o with a circumflex). You also missed off the last letter of the name, which is n.

    It's an utterly contrived name to "outdo" Llanfairpwllgwyngogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch and means in English: "the Mawddach station and its dragon under the northern peace of the Penrhyn Road on the golden beach of Cardigan Bay". Mawddach is the name of the river that flows nearby. The dragon part of the name apparently refers to anti-tank obstacles from the Second World War.

    Unlike the Llanfair example above (which has stuck to a certain degree, but usually shortened to Llanfair PG or Llanfairpwll), the Gorsaf... name has never really been used and the station is called Golt Halt (although there is a sign on the station with the full name).
     

    Ghabi

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    The basic morpheme in Chinese is called "character". A character has one syllable and some specific meanings or connotations.
    A Chinese morpheme can have one, two, three or four syllables. Examples in Cantonese:

    gau2 "dog"
    gaam3gaai3 "embarrassed"
    ham6baang6laang6 "all"
    gi4li1gu4lu4 "to babble"

    A "character" only represents a morpheme when that morpheme is monosyllabic.
     

    inki-minki

    New Member
    awabakal
    Maori langauge of Aotorea has this place

    Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu

    wiki says

    The name "Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu" translates roughly as "The summit where Tamatea, the man with the big knees, the slider, climber of mountains, the land-swallower who travelled about, played his nose flute to his loved one".

    Other versions
    Some forms of the name are longer still: "Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaurehaeaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu" has 92 letters. An even longer version, Taumata-whakatangihanga-koauau-o-Tamatea-haumai-tawhiti-ure-haea-turi-pukaka-piki-maunga-horo-nuku-pokai-whenua-ki-tana-tahu, has 105 letters and means "The hill of the nose-flute playing by Tamatea – who was blown hither from afar, had a slit penis, grazed his knees climbing mountains, fell on the earth, and encircled the land – to his beloved

    theres a utube on how to say it
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Czech:

    nejneznepravděpodobnostňovávatelnějšího, nejneznepravděpodobnostňovávatelnějšímu, nejneznepravděpodobnostňovávatelnějších, nejneznepravděpodobnostňovávatelnějšími

    declined forms of "the most continuously un-improbablizedable"
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Here's one in Japanese, written by a single word, that is read by long words.
    閄(門door+人person): ものかげからきゅうにとびだしてひとをおどろかせるときにはっするこえmonokage-kara kyuu-ni tobidashite hito-wo odorokaseru toki-ni hassuru koe
    The voice that appears when jumping out of the hiding and surprising a person.

    I'm sure it's a quite rare case. :)
     

    Pugnator

    Senior Member
    Neapoilitan (Naples) / Italian (Italy)
    Hola Alc :)

    La palabra mas larga en mi idioma es

    precipitevolissimevolmente (26)

    Ciao! :D Walnut
    your word is a superlative of precipitevolmente, so I don't think that could be considered. I think that one of the largest word on italian is:
    hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliofobico someone who suffer of phobia for long word damn! the medic who conied this term is an asshol* (37 letters)
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Gehandicaptenparkeerplaats (= parking for disabled people) is probably the longest word I use on a normal basis.
    I might use the word gehandicaptenparkeerplaatslijnen (the lines of such a parking) when I ask someone next to me if I have crossed those lines with my car.

    Dutch is a Germanic language so you can make endless compound words.
     

    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    A lot of fun would have been ruined if we had started by defining a word ... As is rather obvious from this thread, some languages can make "words" that other languages would regard as sentences. Sanskrit writers playing around with their language could, I think, write pages of what according to normal rules would count as one word.

    That said, the longest Swedish word in an official word list is realisationsvinstbeskattning (28 letters) ´taxation of sales profits'.

    The longest German word that I've encountered in real life was the description of a machine for which I translated the manual:
    Hochleistungspapierhandtuchfalzmachine (38) - High performance machine for folding paper towels.

    I'm now doing a reprocessing manual. My provisional translation is rekonditioneringsbruksanvisning (31), but I'm afraid the customer won't be too excited about it, so I'll probably change it.
     

    MyriadLeaves

    Member
    Northern British English
    In Danish:
    Speciallægepraksisplanlægningsstabilliseringsperiode (51 letters) = "Stabilisation Period for Planning of Medical Specialist Practice"
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Unfortunately, we don't have a "longest word" in Chinese...no fun. :(
    The basic morpheme in Chinese is called "character". A character has one syllable and some specific meanings or connotations.
    A "word" typically contains 2 to 4 characters, at most 5.
    Any "word" longer than that can be separated into 2 or more "words". That's why we don't consider it as a word, but a phrase.
    Look no further you're not alone.

    The Japanese language doesn't as well have a longest word apart from compound words with a myriad of Chinese characters, local name or science terms.
    So it means there's no extremely long words stemming in old Japanese vocabulary. At least, all I can recall is the words written in 6 letters: uketamawar-u(to receive, to understand), toumorokoshi(corn), matsuribayashi(festival music) and so on.
     

    rainingmind

    Member
    Castellano, España
    Aquí os dejo 22 en español!! :)

    Alfadenobetaparahidroxifenilpropanoicotirosina (es el nombre de una proteína)
    Ciclopentanoperhidrofenantreno (es un hidrocarburo policíclico que se puede considerar un producto de la saturación del fenantreno asociado a un anillo de ciclopentano. Posee 17 átomos de carbono. De esta base estructural derivan los esteroides)
    Dihidroxidofenilalaninabetacarboxilasa (L-DOPA, dopamina sintética)
    Dimetilaminofenildimetilpirazolona (CREO que es un medicamento)
    Formiparaminobenzenosulfamidamidotiazol (medicamento)
    Histerosalpingooforectomía (cirugía consistente en extirpar los órganos sexuales femeninos, es decir, todo el útero, trompas de falopio y ovarios)
    Metacriloxipropiltrimetoxisilano, (es un agente de acoplamiento de particulas de relleno de las resinas dentales.)
    Metilaldibromobutanolonaoatosodicooximetanoatodeme (C1289H2051N343O375S8)
    Monoisotiocianatomonocarbonilotetraacuoaluminio ( II Al (H2O)4(CO)(NCS) )
    Nasofaringolaringofibroscopía (examen endoscópico que analiza las cavidades internas que están comunicadas con la nariz.)
    Oligosacariltransferasa (OST, complejo multimérico localizado en la membrana del retículo endoplasmático.)
    Ortopantomográficamente (relativo a la tomografía de los maxilares empleada en odontología.)
    Otorrinolaringológicamente (relativo a la parte de la medicina que se ocupa de la nariz y la garganta.)
    Pentakismyriohexakisquivoletrascosiohexcontapentagonalis (polígono de 56.456 lados)
    Pentaquismiriohexaquisquilohexacosiotetracontapentágono (polígono de 56.465 lados)
    Pentaquismiriopentaquisquiliotetracosioheptacontapentagonalises (polígono de 55.475 lados)
    Exaquisquiliopentaquisquiliotetracosiohexacontapentagonalis (polígono de.. ehh.. muchos lados)
    Tetrahidrocannabinol (THC, es el principal constituyente psicoactivo del cannabis.)
    Tetratiocianatodiaminocromato ( Cr(NH3)2(SCN)4 )
    Trapesodiostrolatiosoricomoide, (CREO que es el nombre quimico de los esteroides)
    Uvulopalatofaringoplastia (es una cirugía para remover la úvula en parte o en su totalidad, el velo del paladar, faringe o amígdalas)
     

    rainingmind

    Member
    Castellano, España
    hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliofobico someone who suffer of phobia for long word damn! the medic who conied this term is an asshol* (37 letters)
    In Spain this word is also famous: hipototomonstroesquipedalofóbico.
    But it doesn't really exist, in Spanish or Italian: The original term is esquipedalofóbico (in Spanish, but I guess it's similar in Italian).

    Someone added the prefixes hipototo- and monstros- to make it even more ironic and funny.
    In Spanish it's more obvious that the word isn't real, because the prefixes sound like hipopótamo (hippo) and monstruos (monsters) :p

    Anyway the term is long on its own without the prefixes, so the scientific who invented it keeps being an asshol*. :D
     

    dlz628

    New Member
    English
    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. You know, from the Walt Disney musical Mary Poppins?
    But if you only count "real" words, that might get used by someone who isn't a doctor or technician in a very specific field?
    Probably either
    anticonstitucionalmente (“unconstitutionally”) or electroencefalografista (“electroencephalograph technician”)
    What is the longest word in Spanish?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top