look after

John A

New Member
Icelandic
Hi,

Can I say:
"looking after the good spirit"
"looking after the good life"
or
"looking after the good cult"?

Is it wrong to use a word that describes something that you can't see or touch following a "look after" combination?

I'm trying to construct a sentence with the meaning that "someone is looking after the good spirit for you". I know there are other alternatives like "taking care of the good spirit for you" but I'm interested to know if I could use "looking after" in that context.

Can anyone share their views on this?

Best regards,
John
 
  • realmad35

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi,

    "looking after the good spirit"
    "looking after the good life"
    or
    "looking after the good cult"?

    Best regards,
    John
    These sentences won't make sense to me even if you change "look after" for "take care of". It would be good to see them in some context. There is, though, a phrasal verb with "look" in it that is similar to "take care of". It is "look out for". Only it's used with people, not things.
     

    John A

    New Member
    Icelandic
    Hi realmad35,

    In my attempt to put the sentences in a better context:

    B is looking after your good life just like C is looking after your dog tomorrow.
    D is looking after the good vibes in your office just like E is making sure that the spirit is high at the office.

    At first glance these sentences do not make sense to me either and there are other ways to say what I want to say... but are they wrong? If so, what is wrong with them grammatically? Are you only able to use "look after" when dealing with objects but not when dealing with words like spirit, life, cult or emotions?

    Best regards,
    John
     

    realmad35

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi realmad35,

    In my attempt to put the sentences in a better context:

    B is looking after your good life just like C is looking after your dog tomorrow.
    D is looking after the good vibes in your office just like E is making sure that the spirit is high at the office.

    Best regards,
    John
    B looks out for you (in this context), but he'll look after your dog tomorrow. D makes sure the vibes in the office are good. He maintains the good/high spirit in the office.
    It's not a grammatical issue. It concerns the usage of these words.
     

    realmad35

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Are you only able to use "look after" when dealing with objects but not when dealing with words like spirit, life, cult or emotions?

    Best regards,
    John
    I guess so. Only if "to look after" doesn't involve responsibility like in: an organization that looks after the interests of artists.
     
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