Look, fat

Nikined

Senior Member
Russian
"Look, fat, look, here's the deal"

What part of speech is "fat" here? Is it noun?
 
  • Nikined

    Senior Member
    Russian
    That's from a politician's talk with a voter. The man (who was fat) accused the politician of corruption, and the politician answered him in such a way
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It sounds very unlikely - it is not idiomatic. Are you sure this was said? Did you read it? Did you hear it? Was it said by a native speaker of English? Is it a translation?

    What country were they in?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Yes. It's something US President Joe Biden is alleged to have said to a voter: here's the Fox News report of it.

    To answer the question, I would say it's an adjective used as a noun. :)
     

    Nikined

    Senior Member
    Russian
    To answer the question, I would say it's an adjective used as a noun. :)
    Is this normal or is it a mistake? Should adjectives always be followed by the nouns? Is this the same as in the sentence like "What have you done? You broke the vase, you silly/sloppy!"
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Is this normal or is it a mistake? Should adjectives always be followed by the nouns? Is this the same as in the sentence like "What have you done? You broke the vase, you silly/sloppy!"
    It would be more usual to turn it into a noun and say "fatty", "fatso", (or silly/fat so-and-so).

    But given that the scenario here is that he claims that it isn't what he said, the apparently odd grammatical usage does in my opinion lend weight to the theory that it was mis-heard.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's also wrong in AE so it makes no sense. I listened to it and even afterwards I can't explain it. He didn't seem to be using it as a name and he didn't seem to have caught himself halfway through saying fatso or fatty. He didn't emphasize it at all in a way you'd expect if he was purposely using it as an insult. It did not sound like "facts" or to fit the nature of the way his people claim he was using it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    He might have been about to say "fat boy" or even "fat ass", but managed to retrieve it by repeating "look" instead. It's the only answer that makes any sense to me - though I may be the only member to have heard someone addressed as "fat", many years ago, by a speaker of BE.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    My theory is it was a Freudian slip. Earlier he called the questioner "Jack". When he said the sentence in question, he was obviously thinking deeply about something and was a bit distracted. I don't think he even really heard his own words because he was putting his thoughts together. It sounded to me like the word that was "supposed to" come out of his mouth at that point, based on context, was "Jack". It was just a passing use of his name in addressing him. But what actually came out was "Fat". It's hard not to notice that they are both one syllable words with a "short a" vowel in the middle. There is no sign that he caught himself and changed what he was saying. There was no stutter or hesitation. It all flowed smoothly. It seems he intended to say a one syllable word.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I was in two minds - It can be heard as "Look... That... Look... Here's the deal" It sounds as if he was about to say something like, "Look... that's not the case..." but changed his mind. "Fat" doesn't seem to make sense.
     
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