Look out of the window/look out the window

yoku

Member
latviešu valoda
I should say hello!

Is there any difference between these two phrases?
In the book I am trying to read at the moment I keep noticing usage of the second variant (without "of") but in my dictionary there are examples only with the first phrase (with "of").

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Without the "of" would be heard frequently in conversation. In my mind, use of the "of" would be more formal and more likely to be seen in writing. And, yes, they mean the same thing.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I thoroughly dislike the common habit of omitting the "of" in expressions such as this, but I accept it is common and not considered erroneous. (I cringe when I read it in newspapers and similar publications, however.)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I thoroughly dislike the common habit of omitting the "of" in expressions such as this, but I accept it is common and not considered erroneous. (I cringe when I read it in newspapers and similar publications, however.)

    I couldn't agree more. This is why I always specify the use of "of" in writing, at the very least.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Hard to say, yoku - these things tend to creep up on you, but I'd say it's fairly recent. You can't go wrong by playing safe and always including "of".
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Hard to say, yoku - these things tend to creep up on you, but I'd say it's fairly recent. You can't go wrong by playing safe and always including "of".

    I think you'll find it's been around for quite some time, I would say 40 years at least. However, I agree with the other foreros that, at least in writing, the 'of' should not be omitted.
     

    elshan1980

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani
    << --- threads merged here --- >>

    Hi, everybody!

    My question is about the following sentence taken from Blue Grammar Book:

    Correct: You may look out the window.
    Incorrect: You may look out of the window.

    I have always used and seen "to look out of" in that context.
    But the book says the opposite. I'm confused. Please, help me.

    Thanks in advance

    <<< ----------- See Rule#1 ----------- >>>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I will answer for British English.

    You may look out the window. :cross:

    You may look out of the window. :tick:

    Let's see if it is different in AE.

    Google ngram AE: look out the,look out of the
    https://books.google.com/ngrams/gra...t1;,look out the;,c0;.t1;,look out of the;,c0

    You can see that things changed dramatically around the 1960s. Before that "look out of the" was used most often. After that time 'look out the' has taken over.

    Does your book teach AE or BE?
     
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    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    [This post and the following ones, have been added to a previous thread in which the same question was asked. Please read down from the top. DonnyB - moderator.]

    Hi,

    I was trying to describe a picture to my students. It's from The Cat in the Hat. (Here's one picture.)

    In one picture, a boy and a girl sitting at home in front of the window, they can't go out to play because it's raining, I said:

    They look out the window.

    I wonder if it's correct to say so.

    Thanks a lot
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    But, can one say "look out through the window"?

    Edited:

    I think AE speakers say "Look out the window", while BE "look out of the window".
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    You can ‘look out (of) the window’ or ‘look through a window’ but to ‘look out through a window’ is repetition of the action. I have heard people use it, but I wouldn’t.
     
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