look over a vista to the ocean

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
"There are houses that are still standing, but a lot of destruction. We're seeing downed power lines, which is kind of scary to drive around. When you look over normally a gorgeous vista to the ocean, it's just clogged with smoke. The fire is nearly closer to the coast right now, but just tons of destruction up there. It's kind of mind-boggling to see it when I know, you know, what it used to look like before."

How are "to" and "vista" in the third sentence conjugated? I've seen a collocation of vista with "of" as in "a vista of the ocean" not with "to." Is this another idiomatic form?

source: Wildfires Across California Kill At Least 9
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    This is spoken English which seems to have been badly transcribed (to be kind to the speaker!).
    Vista is not followed by to in my experience. It might work with vista towards, but the sentence is almost beyond repair.
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    This is spoken English which seems to have been badly transcribed (to be kind to the speaker!).
    Vista is not followed by to in my experience. It might work with vista towards, but the sentence is almost beyond repair.
    I've only got around 10,000 usages of "vista towards" from the Google. Could you give me some examples?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'm not suggesting that towards is common after vista. But the view can be looking towards something.
    We normally say a vista/view of something.

    Here is an example from a UK newspaper (The Telegraph).
    It describes a painting by Winston Churchill. "View Of Cherkley, painted for his friend Lord Beaverbrook from the terrace of the latter’s country home. The lush, green vista towards a sunny horizon..."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It looks okay to me. I read it differently: when you look over a normally gorgeous vista to (as far as) the ocean...
    I understand it as saying "when you look out over what is normally a gorgeous vista, right out to the ocean..."
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It looks okay to me. I read it differently: when you look over a normally gorgeous vista to (as far as) the ocean...
    I understand it as saying "when you look out over what is normally a gorgeous vista, right out to the ocean..."
    That's refreshing, but do you say "look to" for such a meaning? I've only seen "look at"
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I have no problem with "to" in that context. I look over bla bla bla to somewhere.

    The words in parenthesis can be omitted:
    From my balcony I can look (out) over the treetops to (as far as) the mountains. I can also look over the city to the sea.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    So you could look over a vista to/towards the ocean?
    There's no out in the original text, which seems to confuse look out over the ocean and a vista towards the ocean.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top