loom agape/agape loom

always_getting_better

New Member
Polish - Poland
Hi,

My colleague is looking for a name of her workshops that deal with cognitive and spiritual development (there is some metaphysics involved). She wanted to have the word "loom" plus a concept of god-stemming love. I suggested loom agape/agape loom. Which one is better? Or what is the difference in meaning?

(Yes, I am aware that usually we that nouns in front of a compound noun act more like adjectives than real nouns. But I feel that both of these are acceptable, the first being more emphatic. Am I right?)
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have no opinion on word order, but will suggest that you use agapē, with the accent, rather than agape, which looks to many people like agape: with the mouth wide open, as in wonder:stood there agape at the news.

    You may like the connotations, but the words may be pronounced differently. Still, perhaps your target market is familiar with this and you may not be worried about other people.
     
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    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Basically, loom agape is a kind of agape, whereas agape loom is a kind of loom. That's your starting point. Neither suggests very much to me, and I know what 'agape' is, which most English-speakers probably don't.

    And yes, I was going to suggest using an accent too: agapé could also be used.

    Even with more basic words, it's hard to get any clear idea from either love loom or loom love. Of course, English allows you to do this with any two nouns; given the right context, they could both make perfect sense.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    When choosing a name, it is a good idea to consider how it could be taken by people who are not familiar with the thing named or with the context. Not only might people read "agape" as the adjective that Copyright mentions; they could also read "loom" as the verb (WR: to come into view in indistinct and enlarged form). The combination "loom agape" can suggest some large creature with its mouth wide open in surprise.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I opened the thread thinking it would be about some kind of actual loom. (Actually, I'm still not sure whether it is or not - is physical weaving involved in these seminars?)

    Something like "Weaving the Spirit" might be better. Or it might not. :D
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I'm not sure which "loom" is intended. If it's the verb, using the gerund or the progressive particle (the -ing form "looming") would clear up some confusion. I know more or less what the Greek word "agape" (with the line over the e) means, or at least I did many years ago, but my default reading of "agape" is mouth open.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I opened the thread thinking it would be about some kind of actual loom.
    I was picturing an imposing door which was open and about to fall on me.
    In my experiences with Christianity, agape love is not normally spelled with any diacritical marks so adding them wouldn't necessarily remove the confusion. Once I knew we were talking about love, I was then wondering if "loom" is some other spiritual, metaphysical, foreign term that I'm unfamiliar with.
     

    always_getting_better

    New Member
    Polish - Poland
    Thank you for your answers- the intended meaning of "loom" is the instrument/place used for weaving, but understood spiritually or metaphysically like pob14 wrote (a kind of a loom on which there are threads of fate/agape/godly love)
     
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