loom

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  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Forum rules ask for a complete sample sentence. English Only Forum guidelines
    reiterate that, and call for background and context. You have provided none of these.

    Though it may be obvious to a native speaker, you haven't specified whether your question refers to loom as a noun or a verb.

    Finally, any fairly good dictionary makes the distinction clear.

    A more focused question would be welcomed, providing it includes context and sample sentences.
     

    chimita

    Senior Member
    Chile Spanish
    I'm refering to the verb.
    can I say then, I loom out of a room?
    Because I heard that expression with emerge.
    thanks in advance
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It would not be idiomatic at all. Loom out of is an unusual collocation. Loom implies either having extraordinary size, appearing indistinct, or both.
     

    chimita

    Senior Member
    Chile Spanish
    Thank you very much cuchuflete :)
    So it would be appropriate for an airplane but not for a person, right?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hmmm...an airplane looming out of a room? It would have to be a very large model airplane. :D

    Yes, an airplane emerging from low clouds could be said to loom overhead.
    That would be a correct and idiomatic use of loom to describe the appearance of the plane.
     

    chimita

    Senior Member
    Chile Spanish
    oh, cuchuflete, you made me laugh :)
    Right, I'm sure if a real airplane could emerge from a room then I could use the word loom!
    thanks again
     

    courtney w

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    emerge essentially means "to come out of" or "to appear from out of"...
    i agree with cuchuflete: the word "loom" means that something is very large.
    ie. The mountains loomed over the tiny village.
    the word "loom" also has somewhat of a menacing implication.
    Hope that helps? :)
     

    chimita

    Senior Member
    Chile Spanish
    courtney w,
    you kept me thinking...
    Why menacing?
    in what context would it be menacing?
     

    anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    courtney w,
    you kept me thinking...
    Why menacing?
    in what context would it be menacing?
    You really should look up the word "loom" in the WR dictionary (at the top of this page). There are three definitions for the verb, and the third suggests a threatening or menacing presence.

    I usually think there's something sinister about the verb "to loom" -- but maybe that's just me!
     

    chimita

    Senior Member
    Chile Spanish
    Thanks anothersmith, but before I posted the thread I already looked for it. The thing is that it's difficult to grasp idiomatic uses for me. For instance in the dictonary says loom could be used as:
    "come into view indistinctly"
    And for me emerge from somewhere could have meaned that (as other dictionaries sayid about loom)
    That's why I was a bit confused.
    But anyway, Could I use loom under this circumnstance?
    He loomed through the door and caught his wife cheating on him...
    I mean this could be a certain type of menacing appeareance?
    Thanks again!
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    Thanks anothersmith, but before I posted the thread I already looked for it. The thing is that it's difficult to grasp idiomatic uses for me. For instance in the dictonary says loom could be used as:
    "come into view indistinctly"
    And for me emerge from somewhere could have meaned that (as other dictionaries sayid about loom)
    That's why I was a bit confused.
    But anyway, Could I use loom under this circumnstance?
    He loomed through the door and caught his wife cheating on him...
    I mean this could be a certain type of menacing appeareance?
    Thanks again!
    No, that wouldn't make a lot of sense to say it that way. You could say something to the effect of, "Laura was in the midst of cheating on Ian, when she looked up and saw him looming there in the doorway."

    Let me try to explain the connotations of the word: something looming is threatening, and it's always threatening *to* the person who is seeing it. Therefore, it's almost always used in the context of someone's perception, as in my example, when Laura perceives her husband to be looming.
    Something that is looming could be threatening or menacing for multiple reasons (such as this case, when Ian probably looked quite angry(!)), but something "looming" usually has a connotation of being or seeming quite large, and often being above or over you -- sometimes in addition to being mysterious or indistinct -- and that's nearly always part of what makes it threatening.
    You can also use it for abstract concepts that have the same connotations of the arrival of a large, indistinct threat: for example, a newspaper said that Saddam Hussein was [mentally] "tormented as his death loomed."

    Does that help?
    ~Esca
     

    titan2

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Loom from Webster's,

    1: to come into sight in enlarged or distorted and indistinct form often as a result of atmospheric conditions2 a: to appear in an impressively great or exaggerated form <deficits loomed large> b: to take shape as an impending occurrence

    Emerge simply means to become known.

    The key to the difference between the two might be the word simply.
     
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