Loose hands

María Madrid

Banned
Spanish Spain
This sentence is on a list of remarks regarding management of customer flows. I'm really having a hard time trying to understand it.

Another reason is dropping "loose hands", based on extreme waiting time.

I've never heard that idiom (loose hands). The rest doesn't make so much sense either. Please help!! Thank you! :)
 
  • Celador

    Senior Member
    English / Scotland
    "To have loose hands" usually means having nothing to occupy your time, i.e. you're not busy so you can lend a hand.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    Another reason is dropping "loose hands", based on extreme waiting time.

    What were some of the previous reasons? A few examples might help us.
    I think Celador might be right...it could mean that any employee who isn't 'doing' anything at the moment, can help at the check-out tills to improve the flow of customers (out of the shop etc) and prevent congestion areas.
     

    María Madrid

    Banned
    Spanish Spain
    Masood said:
    What were some of the previous reasons? A few examples might help us.
    I wish I had any!!! The whole text looks as if half of it is missing. Probably what you say is the only possibility that makes sense. More often than not we get originals written by non-native speakers and in some cases and we have to guess, rather than translate. Thank you all very much for your suggestions! :)
     

    Danbury

    New Member
    English
    In a stock market context.
    On who is quick to liquidate their portfolio at the first hint of a correction only to find the market continues to rise higher a short while later. The Trader is said to have had "loose hands" and been shaken out of the market.
     
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