loose schedule

郭巨路

Senior Member
Chinese
hi all

Do you use "loose schedule" to refer to a schedule which gives one a great deal of free time? Other than "loose schedule",are there other expressions of the same meaning

available in everyday English? Besdies "crammed schedule", What expressions can be used to refer to a schedule which give you very little free time ?

thank you very much.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm familiar with the three expressions that heypresto suggested for BE. We use all of them in AE as well.

    I've never heard "loose schedule" for a schedule that leaves a lot of free time, though I'd understand it if I heard it.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    No, you can't use "easy" (or its opposite "difficult") to describe a schedule.

    To emphasize that my schedule has many unfilled ("open") slots, I say "My schedule is wide open."
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    No, you can't use "easy" (or its opposite "difficult") to describe a schedule.

    To emphasize that my schedule has many unfilled ("open") slots, I say "My schedule is wide open."
    Thank you.
    So, can we just use "open"; I have an open schedule?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    For me, "I have an open schedule" or "My schedule is wide open" would refer to a specific period of time: for example, "My schedule is wide open for the next two weeks."

    If you generally want to say that your schedule is not busy, you might say "My schedule is usually wide open."
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    For me, "I have an open schedule" or "My schedule is wide open" would refer to a specific period of time: for example, "My schedule is wide open for the next two weeks."

    If you generally want to say that your schedule is not busy, you might say "My schedule is usually wide open."
    Thank you
    And "open" here means "half filled" or completely free?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Wide open," to me, would mean at least 90% open.

    You can use different adverbs to adjust: "fairly open," "pretty open," etc.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    "Open" and "filled" are used for individual slots in a schedule. For example, if you are making an appointment with Dr. Brown for tomorrow, his receptionist might say:

    He has an opening at 3 pm. He is also open at 10:15. All his other appointment times are filled.

    So saying a schedule is open means that many of the slots (time periods) in the schedule are open (not filled).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think you could say a relaxed schedule is the opposite of a busy schedule in some instances.

    I have a fairly relaxed schedule this week so it should be no problem meeting you for lunch.

    Here are some comparisons. I know from previous posts that the word schedule is used differently in British English.

    Google Ngram Viewer
     
    Last edited:

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    I think you could say a relaxed schedule is the opposite of a busy schedule in some instances.

    I have a fairly relaxed schedule this week so it should be no problem meeting you for lunch.

    Here are some comparisons. I know from previous posts that the word schedule is used differently in British English.

    Google Ngram Viewer
    Thank you.
    I didn't know about "n-gram", so I googled it. But I couldn't find out whether or not the books they use are authentic English texts published in the US or the UK. Do you know for sure that these are authentic texts written by native speakers or published in English-speaking countries?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Google Ngram Viewer

    Look towards the bottom of the page for the word corpora. That shows a list of the different bodies of English writing sources that are used. (corpora = bodies, roughly speaking).

    One example:
    American English 2012 - Books predominantly in the English language that were published in the United States.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    No, at least not in American English. A schedule is not an agenda. An agenda is a list of items to talk about in a meeting in the order you're going to talk about them. A schedule is a set of dates and times where certain meetings or events take place.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Thank you kentix! So I will use "open"
    My schedule is open.
    My schedule is pretty open.
     
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