Lord of the manor

  • Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    Eddie said:
    OK, Amityville.

    Put it in a sentence: The lord of the manor is on vacation (or, on holiday as you Brits say).
    Le seigneur du manoir est en vacances.
    Le seigneur de ce manoir est en vacances.
    Le seigneur est en vacances. (S'il est seigneur, il a un manoir...)
     

    me.edwards

    New Member
    USA English
    Okay Eddie, Gill & Amityville (as in horror?),

    I'm a little confused.
    Which of the sentences describe a title?

    Preffered Style
    Jon Doe, Lord of the Manor, Jon Doe, King of the Ranch, John Kennedy, Prince of Camelot, Iron Face, Chief of the badlands.

    Non Preffered
    Lord of the Edwards Estate, Boss of the Edwards Ranch,etc..........

    Please clarify
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    The "seigneur" owns a "seigneurie" (domain) in which there is a "manoir". The "seigneurie" has a name: e.g. St Edwards. In that case, I would talk about the "seigneur de St Edwards", I would say that the "seigneurie de St Edwards" has a beautiful "manoir". The title of the man would be "Seigneur de St Edwards". I would not say that the title of Queen Elizabeth is Queen of the Castle. She is queen, has many castles and that's good enough for me.
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes, well put, Gil, a seigneur has a manoir, and doesn't harp on about it.
    ME, if the real estate is under discussion -
    Je soussigné, Jon Doe, seigneur du manoir indiqué ci-dessus/en question/ susmentionné...
    Or if you need to establish his local importance without naming the locality, "seigneur de la localité" ?
     

    me.edwards

    New Member
    USA English
    Thanks to all of you,
    Gil, your reply was the easiest to comprehend, I loved the part about the Queen,
    rather humorous. I have learned a new word, seigneur.......does it mean proprietor?
    I'm sorry to do this but it's important to me!
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    From Wikipedia:
    In feudalism, a lord (French: seigneur) has aristocratic rank and claims dominion over a portion of land and the produce and labour of the serfs living thereon.

    You can read more here

    Edit: I read more and found something about "lord of the manor" and "manorialism"... I did not know anything about this part of British history.
     

    me.edwards

    New Member
    USA English
    Eddie, Gil, Amityville,
    Nevermind, I looked the word up myself. (I'm not lazy.) I now know it means "Lord"
    Duh!!!!
    The dictionary gave me..."Seigneur et maitre" as "Lord and Master"
    and "Grand Seigneur" as "High & Mighty"

    Would it therefore be okay to say "Seigneur et maitre du manoir" ?
     

    me.edwards

    New Member
    USA English
    Hey, Comes the Dawn!!
    That one hit the nail on the head! I like the new website also. I see how the term
    "Landlord" evolved and I am assured babies can be born into this title. Let me explain.
    I have a new baby Poodle to register with the American Kennel Club. His name is Roget and he is Champion sired. His pedigree (bloodline) goes back 7 or 8 generations of Champions, maybe more. Because of this I wanted to include a title of sorts with his registration. As with all new babies, they pretty much go immediately to the top of the ladder concerning ruling the new household. What baby wants, baby gets or more elegantly put, Lord of the Manor. Only problem was I couldn't translate into French, with tongue in cheek, Head of Household. And now that I am literate, Ha Ha, I can register him with stature, in French.
    Thank you soooo much for putting up with my questions. You are so kind, patient and knowledgable. And to all who answered so quickly.

    Thanks a million
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Mom
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top