Lord's Prayer

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by ><FISH'>, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. ><FISH'> Senior Member

    United Kingdom
    British English
    Can someone please transliterate for me the Russian version of the Lord's Prayer? Transliterate either to Polish or English, whichever is more accurate to the sounds. Unfortunately I can't find this very easily on the internet.
     
  2. Natalisha Senior Member

    Russian
  3. ><FISH'> Senior Member

    United Kingdom
    British English
    Thanks, it's really great. However I have trouble reading it smoothly since I don't know Russian sounds very well. I will try and transliterate it myself first. If anyone knows the Polish sounds, can they tell me if this is correct?


    Otche nash, izhe yesi na nyebesyekh,
    Otćje nasz, iźe yesi na niebezyech

    da svyatitsya imya Tvoye,
    da swjaticja imja twoje

    da priidet tsarstviye Tvoye,
    da prijdet carcwije twoje

    da budyet volya Tvoya
    da budjet wolja twoja

    yako na nyebesi i na zyemli.
    jak na njebesi i na ziemli

    Khleb nash nasushchnyi dazhd nam dnes,
    Chleb nasz nasuszcznji daźd nam dnes

    i ostavi nam dolgi nasha,
    i ostawi nam dolgi nasza

    yakozhe i mi ostavlyayem dolzhnikom nashim,
    jakoże i mi ostawljajem dolźnikom naszim

    i nye vvedi nas vo iskusheniye,
    i nie wedi nas wo iskuszenje

    no izbavi nas ot lukavago.
    no izbawi nas ot lukavogo
     
  4. ><FISH'> Senior Member

    United Kingdom
    British English
    I think this is not the version I want. How about this one:

    Отче наш, сущий на небесах!
    Да святится имя Твоё;
    Да придёт Царство Твоё;
    Да будет воля Твоя
    И на земле, как на небе;
    Хлеб на насущный
    Дай нам на сей день;
    И прости нам долги наши,
    как и мы прощаем
    должникам нашим;
    И не введи нас в искушение,
    Но избавь нас от лукавого.
    Ибо Твоё есть Царство
    И сила и слава во веки.
    Аминь.
     
  5. Natalisha Senior Member

    Russian
    Why not listen to it?
     
  6. Natalisha Senior Member

    Russian
    This version is not familiar to me, but I know the version I gave you by heart.
     
  7. morzh

    morzh Banned

    USA
    Russian
    Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie.......

    This is the only part of "Pater Noster" I know (also the most practical one). With the notable exception of the remembered from my childhood "Иже еси на небеси" :D from the Russian version.
     
  8. Sobakus Senior Member

    No by far it's not. Your "j"s everywhere baffle me :rolleyes:

    Otche nash, izhe yesi na nyebesyekh,
    Otće nasz, iźe jesi na niebesiech

    da svyatitsya imya Tvoye,
    da swiatitsa imia twoje

    da priidet tsarstviye Tvoye,
    da priidet carstwije twoje

    da budyet volya Tvoya
    da budiet wola twoja

    yako na nyebesi i na zyemli.
    jako na niebiesi i na ziemli

    Khleb nash nasushchnyi dazhd nam dnes,
    Chleb nasz nasuśnyj daźdz nam dneś

    i ostavi nam dolgi nasha,
    i ostawi nam do
    łgi nasza

    yakozhe i my ostavlyayem dolzhnikom nashim,
    jakoże i my ostawlajem do
    łźnikom naszim

    i nye vvedi nas vo iskusheniye,
    i nie wwedi nas wo iskuszenije

    no izbavi nas ot lukavago.
    no izbawi nas ot łukavogo

    ps: si and ś at the word end stand for soft s, not soft sz as in Polish.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
  9. Nanon

    Nanon Senior Member

    Entre Paris et Lisbonne
    français (France)
    Fish, your version looks like a translation from Church Slavonic into modern Russian. Natalisha's version might however be the most frequently used one.
     
  10. ><FISH'> Senior Member

    United Kingdom
    British English
    Thanks Sobakus. I used many "j"'s because it's more familiar to me.

    I am trying to find the version which someone said to me, and I think the latter one I posted is the one I heard. Although honestly, he may have just merged the two.
     
  11. Lepus timidus

    Lepus timidus New Member

    Russian
    lo,

    The problem with Lord’s Prayer is that what one hears often is actually a mixture of modern Russian and Church Slavonic texts (but almost never a version in either “pure” language). I can offer you two transcriptions:

    The following Russian text is from Russian Synodal Bible (Mathiew 6:9-14), which is commonly used. There is no need to avoid pronouncing ё’s (stressed “jo”) when it is read in Russian, but you need to be careful with two things: 1) do not pronounce “i” in “ie”, “ia”, because unlike in Polish “i” stays there just to show that the previous consonant is softened; 2) unstressed Russian “о” becomes a sound somewhat between “a” and “o”, and both strong “a” and “o” nuances will be perceived unnatural, as local dialects.

    Отче наш, сущий на небесах! да святится имя Твоё;
    да приидет Царствие Твоё; да будет воля Твоя и на земле, как на небе;
    хлеб наш насущный дай нам на сей день;
    и прости нам долги наши, как и мы прощаем должникам нашим;
    и не введи нас в искушение, но избавь нас от лукавого. Ибо Твоё есть Царство и сила и слава во веки. Аминь.

    O
    tćie naś, suśćij na niebiesah! da sviatitsa imia Tvajo;
    da priidiet Carstvije Tvajo; da budiet volia Tvaja i na ziemlie, kak na niebie;
    hliep naś nasuśćnyj daj nam na siej dien’;
    i prasti nam dalgi naśy, kak i my praśćajem dalżnikam naśym;
    i nie vviedi nas v iskuśienije, no izbav’ nas at lukavava. Iba Tvajo jest’ Carstva i sila i slava va vieki. Amin’.

    The Church Slavonic text is written in older Cyrillic script with obsolete letters and diacritical marks, as you can see in this text taken from a prayer book: http://amenra.ru/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Ris_4_Otche1_354_500_150_We.jpg Apart from lexical changes, there are changes in stress, stronger unstressed “о”s (these were actually two separate letters borrowed from Greek o-micron and o-mega) and always “je” instead of stressed “jo”. I’ll do my best transcribing it, but it may need a second look of a professional:

    Otćie naś, iże jesi na niebiesieh! da sviatitsia imia tvoje: da priidiet carstvije tvoje: da budiet volia tvaja, jako na niebiesi, i na ziemli. Hlieb naś nasuśćnyj dażd’ nam dnies’: i ostavi nam dolgi naśa, jakoże i my ostavliajem dolżnikom naśym. I nie vviedi nas vo iskuśienije, no izbavi nas ot lukavago. Jako tvoje jest’ carstvo, i sila, i slava vo vieki, amin’.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
  12. henrylee100 Senior Member

    Russian
    in fact there's no real confusion, the church slavonic version is used in the Russian orthodox church, all their prayer books are in Church Slavonic, the only concession they've made so far is that they're now increasingly using the standard Cyrillic alphabet in their prayer books, but the language is still Church Slavonic.
    The Russian translation is used by baptists, evangelicals, Pentecostals, Presbyterians and all the other denominations operating in Russia, probably even by the Roman Catholics as their thing is Latin and they don't have much use for Church Slavonic.
     
  13. david672orford New Member

    English - New England
    In case anyone has missed the irony, the Russian translation to which you refer in the Synodal edition, a product of the Russian Orthodox Church.
     

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