Louis XIV [Reading number in the name of a monarch]

  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think your purists, even those who get the spelling right, are revoltingly pretentious.

    It's Louis Quatorze if you are speaking French, which is against the rules in this forum.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think it may depend on the context. At an antique furniture auction I would be surprised not to hear the French version. In a school history lesson most probably the English one would be used.

    What is the context you are thinking of grokjae?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Louis Quatorze is in the Merriam Webster dictionary as an adjective.
    Yes. It's correct English to describe a style of furniture: "a Louis Quatorze table." When discussing the French king in English, it's Louis the Fourteenth - unless, as Thomas T. posted, one wants to be pretentious.
     
    Hi Egmont,
    Sure, let's be picky. Note the that OP did NOT ask about referring to a king of France. It asked about the label "Louis XIV".

    Hence to point out an adjectival use is relevant. And that is commonly pronounced, French style, as a now recognized word in English, its use having nothing to do with pretense.


    http://www.french-antiques.gallery/2014/04/15/louis-xiv-armoire-sideboard-table-console/

    Apr 15, 2014 - Louis XIV table and console :
    The Louis XIV table is not really in the mood at this period.




    Yes. It's correct English to describe a style of furniture: "a Louis Quatorze table." When discussing the French king in English, it's Louis the Fourteenth - unless, as Thomas T. posted, one wants to be pretentious.
     

    Whirl

    Member
    English - US
    Uh, when I was in public High School back in the Disco Ages, my teachers pronounced Louis XIV looē katorz. In fact they used the French pronunciation on all the French names be they king, noble or cook; be they cardinal, soldier or encyclopedist. We were expected to know exactly who they meant - even if we weren't taking French as a second language.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Uh, when I was in public High School back in the Disco Ages, my teachers pronounced Louis XIV looē katorz. In fact they used the French pronunciation on all the French names be they king, noble or cook; be they cardinal, soldier or encyclopedist. We were expected to know exactly who they meant - even if we weren't taking French as a second language.
    How bizarre:eek:
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    From post #10
    Louis XIV table and console :
    Whatever mood it's in, that quotation tells us nothing about how one would read it out loud, does it? But it's a French site, with armoires and suchlike, so...
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Uh, when I was in public High School back in the Disco Ages, my teachers pronounced Louis XIV looē katorz.
    And I'd always thought of the US West as a plain-speaking place. Back in Pennsylvania where I went to high school (which we didn't capitalize), that Louis was the Fourteenth. (He might have been Quatorze in French class, had his name ever come up, but topics there didn't get much beyond "the pen of my aunt" and "the book on the table".)
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    "Le Roi Soleil" or Louis Quatorze is the "title" for a very important French King from yonks' back. Since my school days I have always stuck with Louis Quatorze. Just recognition of a very influential personage in the history of France and Europe.

    There are enough examples of Louis Quatorze in English texts imply that using Louis Quatorze is an accepted wording that one can simply use. Not everyone agrees: as a number of posters to this thread have remarked. :warn:

    GF..

    << --- misleading --- >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Allow the OED to shoot this fox:
    Louis Quatorze, n. /luːiː kæˈtɔːz/
    Louis XIV, King of France, 1643–1715. Used adjectively to designate the styles in architecture, furniture, decorative art, etc., characteristic of his reign. Rarely Louis as adj. to designate what was prevalent in two or more of the above-mentioned reigns.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    For example, Louis XIV, should it be read as "Louis the fourteenth"? Or whatever else?
    You gave Louis XIV only as an example. Presumably, you are asking about any monarch. If so, note that usually (with exceptions such as several French monarchs) we usually use "the" before the number, e.g. Henry the fifth, Francis the first, Edward the third, George the third, Elizabeth the second, etc.
     
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