Love you. Miss you. (Omitted subject pronoun.)

user447

Banned
Hindi
I mean I've heard people say things like

Miss you

Love you

I dont know why But it doesn't sound idiomatic to me.

I mean love you kind of sounds right.

But miss you does not
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    People often leave off the initial pronoun 'I' in casual conversation, or in writing that imitates casual conversation.

    It wouldn't surprise to have someone I knew wall write or say 'Miss you.' It indicates familiarity. I wouldn't expect someone to say it who wasn't a close friend or relative.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Miss you' is idiomatic in the informal contexts described above. People often say "Loveya, missya", like a formula, when they're saying goodbye.
     
    Last edited:

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In informal speech it is quite common to omit the subject when it is "I".

    "What do you think of John?
    "Can't stand the man. He thinks too much of himself.


    Phone conversation between lovers.
    "Miss you!"
    "Missing you too!"
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Can't stand the man. He thinks too much of himself.
    We might even miss out other personal pronoun,
    "Can't stand the man. Thinks too much of himself."
    "Terrible people! Should be locked up for life."
    "Wonderful woman! Salt of the earth!"
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    "Wonderful woman! Salt of the earth!"
    I have a question about "Wonderful woman!" I think it stands for "She is a wonderful woman!" You omitted "She is a" and got "Wonderful woman!"

    But I've heard people say like "A nice idea!" In this phrase the article A is kept. So I don't really understand, should I keep the article or leave it out?

    For example, if I want to leave a comment under a YouTube video where a very nice girl sings a song, should I write "A very nice singer!" or "Very nice singer!"?
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I have a question about "Wonderful woman!" I think it stands for "She is a wonderful woman!" You omitted "She is a" and got "Wonderful woman!"

    But I've heard people say like "A nice idea!" In this phrase the article A is kept. So I don't really understand, should I keep the article or leave it out?

    For example, if I want to leave a comment under a YouTube video where a very nice girl sings a song, should I write "A very nice singer!" or "Very nice singer!"?
    This is not about subject pronouns - it's about articles. It's a separate question and needs a separate thread. :)
     
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