low rumble <of /for> a voice

Madrid001

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello!


1. He is darkly handsome with Dracula eyebrows and a low rumble of a voice.

In the sentence above, could I substitute ''of'' for ''for''? It would read:

2. He is darkly handsome with Dracula eyebrows and a low rumble for a voice.


Would it change the meaning of the sentence? Would it sound strange to you to here this?

Thank you


Correct my English, please.
 
  • theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi Madrid,

    #2 does sound strange to me, because "for" in this context implies "in the place of." So instead of having a voice, he would have a "low rumble."

    For comparison: "The rag doll had buttons for eyes and wool for hair."
     

    Madrid001

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    So if I said: I have an angel for a mother

    Would it mean that my mother is an angel? metaphorically speaking of course.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    So if I said: I have an angel for a mother

    Would it mean that my mother is an angel? metaphorically speaking of course.
    Absolutely. That's a good example. And you could also say "I have an angel of a mother," which means that she's like an angel rather than stating metaphorically that she is an angel.
     
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