luogo: site or place?

GiraSole

New Member
Italy, Italian
Buon pomeriggio a tutti voi.
Esordisco nel forum con questo primo messaggio per sapere:
come è meglio tradurre l'espressione latina "Genius Loci", Spirito del Luogo?
"Spirit of (the) place" or "Spirit of (the) site"? :confused:
c'è una terza opzione?

Good Afternoon to you all.
This my very first message in the forum just to know:
how can I better translate the latin expression "Genius Loci"?
"Spirit of (the) place" or "Spirit of (the) site"?
is there any third option?

Grazie!
 
  • DDT

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Hi Girasole,
    Welcome to WR forums!

    I'd suggest "spirit of a place"
    Please notice that a third common option to render luogo is "spot"

    DDT
     

    Rob625

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Buongiorno GiraSole, e benvenuto al forum!

    'Genius Loci' is a latin tag well known to educated english people. I would translate it as 'the spirit of the place'.

    'Site' is used more in technical contexts. We talk about an archaeological site, a website, the site of a battle, but we don't often use 'site' on its own.
     

    Manuela

    Senior Member
    Italy -Italian/English
    "The place's spirit".. just to give it a spin
    As spirit do you mean "fantasma" because in that case it would be GHOST
    "The ghost of the place" or even better "the phantom of the place"
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    DDT said:
    Hi Girasole,
    Welcome to WR forums!

    I'd suggest "spirit of a place"
    Please notice that a third common option to render luogo is "spot"

    DDT
    True. But having referenced a latin expression, "spot" seems very informal...no?
     

    Merlino

    Senior Member
    The Netherlands
    lsp said:
    True. But having referenced a latin expression, "spot" seems very informal...no?
    Why? Latin is just a language like any other... Everyone in Rome spoke that language about 2000 years ago, not just saints and other 'really important' people...
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Merlino said:
    Why? Latin is just a language like any other... Everyone in Rome spoke that language about 2000 years ago, not just saints and other 'really important' people...
    I couldn't disagree more. Referencing a 2000 year old language by inserting one of the few surviving isolated expressions still in circulation into a sentence or sentences otherwise exclusively constructed in a modern language is not like using "a language like any other."
     

    Merlino

    Senior Member
    The Netherlands
    lsp said:
    I couldn't disagree more. Referencing a 2000 year old language by inserting one of the few surviving isolated expressions still in circulation into a sentence or sentences otherwise exclusively constructed in a modern language is not like using "a language like any other."
    I never quite understood why latin is such an elevated, or holy if you will, language... At the moment I'm following a class in the origins of Italian all the way from the Proto-Indo-European through vulgar latin to contemporary italian and it has only strengthened my beliefs that latin is just a language spoken by the people in Rome and has only survived in this form because of the catholic church.

    Another point is that italian is much further away from latin as is greek from ancient greek, in other words ancient greek was perhaps an ever more beautiful 'classic' language than was latin because it was already more 'perfect' at the time...
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Merlino, a parte nell'antica Roma, il latino ha continuato ad esistere solo per gli uomini di cultura, ecco perché è arrivato a noi, sino ad oggi, come lingua elitaria: chi conosce frasi e locuzioni latine è solitamente qualcuno che ha ricevuto un'educazione classica. Questa discussione meriterebbe un capitolo a parte, perché è piuttosto complessa, ma spero tu possa comprendere che non sono molte le persone in grado di citare a proposito dalla lingua latina.
     

    Manuela

    Senior Member
    Italy -Italian/English
    I agree with Silvia
    and let's not forget that Latin is the root of the Romance languages- Italian, Spanish, Romanian and French...Talking about a "useless" language!!! to me it seems just as important as learning our history.
    How did this discussion turn into "cultura" anyway??( not that I mind)

    ciao
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Manuela said:
    I agree with Silvia
    and let's not forget that Latin is the root of the Romance languages- Italian, Spanish, Romanian and French...Talking about a "useless" language!!! to me it seems just as important as learning our history.
    How did this discussion turn into "cultura" anyway??( not that I mind)

    ciao
    even German and English (and other languages) have their roots deep inside Latin
     

    Merlino

    Senior Member
    The Netherlands
    alfry said:
    even German and English (and other languages) have their roots deep inside Latin
    I don't want to stir up an argument, let's say whether Latin is a special language among other ancient languages is a matter of opinion. But the fact you've stated is simply untrue. Both latin and the germanian languages like english, dutch and german are deriven from Proto-Indo-European, any linguist will tell you that. Saying that Dutch/English/German have their roots in Latin is like saying that languages spoken in India have their roots in Latin, because those languages too have similarities with Latin. But that is also because they're derived from Proto-Indo-European, hence the Indo in the name.
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Merlino said:
    I don't want to stir up an argument, let's say whether Latin is a special language among other ancient languages is a matter of opinion. But the fact you've stated is simply untrue. Both latin and the germanian languages like english, dutch and german are deriven from Proto-Indo-European, any linguist will tell you that. Saying that Dutch/English/German have their roots in Latin is like saying that languages spoken in India have their roots in Latin, because those languages too have similarities with Latin. But that is also because they're derived from Proto-Indo-European, hence the Indo in the name.
    I'm not a linguist so I cannot refute the Proto-Indo-European theory.

    I can only state that English is not derived from Latin and it's a Germanic language but it has a lot of words derived from Latin words (probably during the Middle Ages).
     
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