Lust / Zeit haben + position of zu

jamesjaime

Senior Member
English - England
I'm learning German and I don't quite understand the difference between these two phrases:

Hast du Zeit einkaufen zu gehen?
Hast du Lust einzukaufen?


.... I understand the meaning of both, but why in the first one is it not "Hast du Zeit einzukaufen gehen"? As it says in the book that zu, as in the second example, goes in between the verb and the particle. Is it because there is a second verb, gehen, involved?
 
  • Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    The main verb in the first example is "gehen" (=> zu gehen):

    Hast du Zeit (einkaufen) zu gehen?
    Hast du Zeit (die Kinder abholen) zu gehen?

    Hast du Zeit (in die Stadt) zu gehen?


    The main verb in the second example is "einkaufen" (=> einzukaufen):

    Hast du Lust einzukaufen?
    Hast du Zeit die Kinder abzuholen?

     

    Ptolemy2.18

    Senior Member
    German - (West)Germany
    Kann man sagen, Hast du Zeit um spazierenzugehen?
    Ich meine: um zu
    Ich würde sagen, das geht, spazierenzugehen muss allerdings auseinander geschrieben werden.

    Auch Hast du Zeit spazieren zu gehen ist in meinen Augen richtig.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Eine weitere Möglichkeit:
    Hast du Zeit zum Spazierengehen?

    (Bei ›Lust‹ könnte man sagen:
    Hast du Lust auf einen Spaziergang?)
     

    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I don't quite understand the difference between these two phrases:

    Hast du Zeit einkaufen zu gehen?
    Hast du Lust einzukaufen?
    You can also say it vice versa:

    Hast du Lust einkaufen zu gehen?
    Hast du Zeit einzukaufen?

    The different infinitive clauses are not required syntactically by the preceding noun, as you might assume. The difference is a merely semantic one in that both first cases with gehen indicate absence from home (or mental absence because you are too absorbed in the action of shopping); going shopping.

    In both second cases you might be shopping at home, in the internet or on the phone watching a home shopping channel on TV (hopefully with your attention still open for other things happening around you).

    Gehen + infinitive
    is similar to the absentive aspect in German sein + infinitive.
     
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