M., Mme, Mlle

muznee

New Member
Maldives / Dhivehi
Hi
i am just new to French language. Can any one tell me the long form and translations of these Short forms.
 
  • Sickduck

    Senior Member
    French - Canada
    M. = Mister (Mr.)
    Mme = Missus (Mrs)
    Mlle = Miss (no abbreviation, unless you use: Ms).

    Mrs is the abbreviation of the no-longer-used word «Mistress» as the female equivalent of «Mister». With the abolition of slavery, Mistress has been replaced by Missus, but the abbreviation remains Mrs.
     
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    VixenFox

    Banned
    USA English
    M. Mme. & Mlle

    Also, I think the word madame is abbreviated without the period because the abbreviation ends with the same letter as the word. Earlier today, I was trying to remember the abbreviation for the plural form of monsieur which is messieurs. Can someone please tell me? Thanks! (...)
     
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    mplsray

    Senior Member
    M. Mme. & Mlle

    Also, I think the word madame is abbreviated without the period because the abbreviation ends with the same letter as the word. Earlier today, I was trying to remember the abbreviation for the plural form of monsieur which is messieurs. Can someone please tell me? Thanks! (...)
    I'd like to point out a difference between American English and British English here: When a woman from a French-speaking country continues to be be referred to by the French title rather than Mrs., that title is generally spelled with a period (full stop). You can see this in the online Encarta, American Heritage, and Random House dictionaries--Merriam-Webster's dictionary gives Mme without the period. The title Mlle, also occasionally used instead of Miss for a girl or woman from a French-speaking country, is also shown with a period in the first three dictionaries and without a period in the M.-W. dictionary, except that the Random House adds Mlle (without a period) as a variant spelling.

    In all these cases, the British--who, as a general rule, use abbreviations with periods much less than do Americans--show the abbreviations as they would appear in French, without the periods.

    Additional information: Mme. is also used in the case of some internationally-known women who do not come from a French-speaking country: Mme. Chiang Kai-Shek, for example.

    Still more information: The plural of these titles, Mmes. and Mlles. are similarly treated in the dictionaries in question, with the exception that the Random House dictionary shows no variant spelling of Mlles. without the period.

    The title Mmes. is occasionally used as a plural of Mrs.: Mmes. Smith and Jones were elected to the Board of Directors.
     
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    Dynamite

    Senior Member
    French - FRANCE
    In French :
    M. = Monsieur
    MM. = Messieurs
    Mme = Madame (femme mariée)
    Mmes = Mesdames (femmes mariées)
    Mlle = Mademoiselle
    Mlles = Mesdemoiselles

    [...]
     
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    Schmorgluck

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Just a quick cultural insight: while in English a word has been invented specifically to be neither "Miss" nor "Missus", in French the tendancy is to simply abandon "Mademoiselle" (although "Mondamoiseau" is used jokingly in feminist circles - who said feminists are no fun?), with the notable exception of actresses who, for historical reasons, have been called "Mademoiselle" for centuries no matter their marital status.
    Some years ago, in France, official forms required to check "M" "Mme" or "Mlle". This is less and less the case. Most forms, nowadays, just ask "M" or "Mme".
     

    polaire

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    [...]
    I've noticed that unmarried women of a certain age are called "Madame."

    By the way, in America, actresses overwhelmingly prefer to be called "actors." I assume it's because they think that "actor" sounds more serious. To me "actress," is not demeaning, but since the people who do the job clearly think it is, I follow their preference.
     
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    Hyperion

    Member
    Finland, Swedish
    It's Mr and Dr without the period in International English, because it's a contraction abbreviation. The Bristish still use period to abbreviations that are truncated. I guess americans just don't care about the rules.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    What is "international English" Hyperion? I have never heard that term...

    The AE rules are that Mr./Mrs./Ms. all have periods. If they don't they are considered incorrectly spelled here.

    I question the validity of the contraction argument. Contractions have apostrophes--don't = do not. Using that logic, Mister should be written M'r

    Where is the R in "missus", the never-written full form of Mrs.? And Ms. is a modern construct that has no long form--it isn't contracted at all.
     

    Mme Machin

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hyperion, I find your comment about Americans offensive. Many of us do care about the rules. Please capitalize the word "Americans," by the way. Thank you!

    The only time I have seen abbreviations such as Mr. and Dr. written without periods by Americans is in emails (when people frequently abbreviate spellings and leave out punctuation).
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    It's Mr and Dr without the period in International English, because it's a contraction abbreviation. The Bristish still use period to abbreviations that are truncated. I guess americans just don't care about the rules.
    As the Wikipedia article "International English" states, it is a concept, not an actual set of standards. As the article says,
    Sometimes "international English" and the related terms above refer to a desired standardisation, i.e. Standard English; however, there is no consensus on the path to this goal.
    One can hardly blame Americans[1] for failing to follow a standard which does not actually exist. As previously noted, we have our own standard--and, as such standards go, a quite strong one--for the punctuation of such abbreviations as Mr. and Dr.

    [1]The word Americans is capitalized, as far as I am aware, in every standard dialect of English.
     
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    bettysue222

    New Member
    English
    Hi, What an interesting discussion!
    I have just encountered in a French (Quebec) newspaper article the title Me and am not sure how to translate it. Here's the sentence:

    Lepoirier était représenté par son avocat Me Richard Lepommier.

    Any thoughts? Thanks so much!
    -catherine
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    Maître, I imagine, as that is the title for a lawyer.

    AS an interesting side point; the English have invented their own abbreviation for Messieurs - Mssrs. It is (or used to be) used in company names.
     
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