M. R. A.

Q-cumber

Senior Member
Hi!

He <a cop> put his big hand out. "No hard feelings?"
"M. R. A." I <a private eye> said and shook the hand.
He grinned all over...

<......>

...Не nodded, and then he smiled.
"M. R. A." he said.
What does 'M. R. A.' stand for here?
 
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  • Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Q, you've given us a good quote, but we need more context. What book is this from? What have they been discussing previously? I suspect that this is a reference to something the two have discussed previously, but we need more information, before we can help.
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Q, you've given us a good quote, but we need more context. What book is this from? What have they been discussing previously? I suspect that this is a reference to something the two have discussed previously, but we need more information, before we can help.
    This is from the 'Farewell, My Lovely' novel by Raymond Chandler (written in 1940). The text is available here. Please scroll down to the end of the Chapter 33.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    It is probably an abbreviation for Moral Rearmament (page 142), but I have no idea what they mean by that.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    There is an interesting article on Moral Re-armament on Wikipedia:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_Re-Armament

    The movement had Christian roots, and grew into an informal, international network of people of all faiths and backgrounds. It was based around what it calls 'the Four Absolutes' (absolute honesty, absolute purity, absolute unselfishness and absolute love) and encouraged its members to be actively involved in political and social issues. One of the movement's core ideas was that changing the world starts with seeking change in oneself.

    An earlier name of the movement was the Oxford group.
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    There is an interesting article on Moral Re-armament on Wikipedia:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_Re-Armament

    The movement had Christian roots, and grew into an informal, international network of people of all faiths and backgrounds. It was based around what it calls 'the Four Absolutes' (absolute honesty, absolute purity, absolute unselfishness and absolute love) and encouraged its members to be actively involved in political and social issues. One of the movement's core ideas was that changing the world starts with seeking change in oneself.

    An earlier name of the movement was the Oxford group.
    OK, it makes some sense, because the cop was somewhat crooked and he did some bad things towards Philip Marlowe. That's why he asks about 'hard feelings'...
     
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