Maß (Bier)

DaveyA

Member
English
Could someone please give me a correct translation of this sentence. It is taken from a transcript about beer gardens. The website is called Slow German and I have just discovered it. I think it is really great for anyone like me who is trying to learn the language. Anyway the sentence is

Ein ganzer Liter Bier passt hier rein, und das Glas nennt man somit nicht mehr Glas, sondern Mass.

My interpretation is
A whole litre of beer is suitable here and it is no longer known as a glass but Mass(?) What is Mass?

Thanks
 
  • Sidjanga

    Senior Member
    German;southern tendencies
    Hi,
    actually, it would have to be Maßkrug for the "glass", and not just Maß (note that the a in Maß is long, so the official spelling in Austria and Germany is with ß, not ss).

    Maß is normally just used for the "unit", i.e. one litre, and you then order "eine Maß Bier", which in the south of Germany is usually pronounced "a Måß" (and there is generally no need to explicitely state that it's "Bier" you want :)).

    Ein ganzer Liter Bier passt hier rein, und das Glas nennt man somit nicht mehr Glas, sondern Mass [
    actually Maß.]

    A whole litre of beer fits in here, and the "glass" is thus no longer called a "Glas", but a "Maß". /
    This "glass" fits/holds/contains/admits (?) a whole litre of beer, and is thus no longer called a "Glas", but a "Maßkrug".

    In the English version of the Wikipedia article they call it Beer stein - although that term doesn't seem to be limited to the ones that hold exactly one litre.
     
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    Sidjanga

    Senior Member
    German;southern tendencies
    (...) I wonder why they have used ss and not ß?
    ß is not used in Switzerland - other than that, you'd probably better ask the authors of the site. :)
    So have I got the gist of the sentence correct?
    Dave
    I edited my above post before seeing your reply. I hope you'll be able to find everything there now - if not, do ask again.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In Bayern spricht man "Mass" kurz aus - und wegen der Regel, dass nach einem kurzen Vokal ein doppeltes "ss" kommt, schreiben es dort viele so.
    Soweit ich mich erinnere, war das eine zulässige Ausnahme in der Rechtschreibreform. Ganz sicher bin ich nicht, werde aber recherchieren. - Ja, es stimmt: http://www.korrekturen.de/docs/duden22.pdf
    Maß, bes. bayr. auch Mass; 2 Mass Bier

    "Mass" indicates the pronunciation in Bayern. It is an exception in the spelling reform.
    In Bayern they speak it short, so they write it with "ss".

    At least this was the status after the reform. I'm not sure about the reform of the reform.
     
    Last edited:

    Sidjanga

    Senior Member
    German;southern tendencies
    (...) "Mass" indicates the pronunciation in Bayern. It is an exception in the spelling reform.
    In Bayern they speak it short, so they write it with "ss" (...)
    Well, the underlined is true to some extent, but I am really surprised to read this - according to that logic, in any case you'd have to be consequent and spell it "Måss". ;)
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Well, the underlined is true to some extent, but I am really surprised to read this - according to that logic, in any case you'd have to be consequent and spell it "Måss". ;)
    I'm not surprised at all. :) After all the text isn't written in dialect but in standard language, and as the rule of the spelling reform says that short vowel is followed by "ss" Bavarian locals just apply this rule. The reform never took into account that vowel quality differs in some cases regionally.

    "Maß" (measure) vs. "Maß" (glass of beer) (both written like that according to the latest spelling reform) actually are a minimal pair in Austria and Bavaria, they're clearly pronounced differently, both in standard language and dialect.

    (In Austria we usually drink our beer in half-litre glasses but I too would have thought that it should be "Maß", according to the new spelling; only now I discovered that this is not so.)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    In the English version of the Wikipedia article they call it Beer stein - although that term doesn't seem to be limited to the ones that hold exactly one litre.
    For the record, in English beer stein, or simply stein,* refers to either the typical German Maßkrug (both the liter and half-liter versions) or those German/Belgian-style, colorfully decorated earthenware ones (used mostly as decoration or collector's items and not really for drinking).

    I personally use stein to mean a liter Maß or, if I have to, say liter stein or half-liter stein to be more specific; but since this phenomenon is not very popular in North America - except in the Hofbräuhaus bars - I usually don't have much occasion to say it. :(:D

    *pronounced [st...], not the German [ʃt...].
     
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