Madame est servie

nohams

Member
Arabic/English
Hey,
I read that "Madame est servie" expression is translated to "Madam you are served" but, would like to know more details. Is it common in restaurants only for example? is it formal? is it meant Madam as "Mrs"? or does it work for both "Miss" and "Mrs"?
Also, how common is it?

Thank You
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    My feeling is that it's only used by servants in high society.

    They would say Madame rather than Monsieur because the lady usually ran the household.
     

    nohams

    Member
    Arabic/English
    Thanks you all...
    - Can the expression have other forms too? for example, "Monsieur est servi" or "Mademoiselle est servie"?
    - is it commonly used in France?
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Thanks you all...
    - Can the expression have other forms too? for example, "Monsieur est servi" or "Mademoiselle est servie"?
    Yes, if there is no lady in this house, the butler can say : "Monsieur est servi" ...Mademoiselle, too, but it's not so common. I imagine an old and of course not married "Mademoiselle"...

    - is it commonly used in France?
    No, as Lezert said, it's very formal, so very seldom.
    You can hear it in movies or more often for joking.
     
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