made every day of the week, <so/ but/ for> unlike in other ages

vkhu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week,___78___unlike in other ages, new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways.

A but
B so
C for

Why is A the only correct answer here? Can't I just use B and C as well?

Note: it came from a passage but this sentence has enough context on its own. If you need, I'll give you the link to the exercise
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Note: it came from a passage but this sentence has enough context on its own. If you need, I'll give you the link to the exercise
    I'm afraid it doesn't have enough content on its own, vkhu:(.

    As well as giving us a link, could you please type out for us:
    - the two preceding sentences
    - the sentence after.
     
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    vkhu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Original test:
    http://adf.ly/93YqA
    It has explanations for the answer but they are all in Chinese so if you can read them, please translate them for me.

    The rate at which new and sometimes contradictory information comes at us further
    contributes to our feelings of instability and transience. It's estimated that 90 percent of all scientists who ever lived are alive today. New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week,___78___unlike in other ages, new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways. The influence of new technology on our lives is felt almost immediately.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think it has to be "but".
    With "so" or "for", the sentence would suggest that the reason for new ideas being applied quickly is that they are made every day of the week.
    That is not the intended meaning. Take out the "unlike in other ages" part.

    The intention is to tell us that there is a significant contrast between now and the past; now, new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways.
    And this has a consequence that is explained in the next sentence.
    Only "but" carries the right sense of introducing a contrasting thought that can lead nicely to the consequence.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Your link didn't work for me, vkhu, so it's very helpful that you provided the immediate context:thumbsup:.

    I agree with panj that of the three options given in post 1, the only possibility, in context, is "but". But I too would prefer cycloneviv's "and".
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    Almost yes. Omit the 'since' and we have
    every day we find out something new...: The problem is, that because we have these new discoveries, it does not automatically follow that these are then quickly applied in practical ways.
    Hence, we cannot write: New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week, SO new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways.

    'for' in the sentence would be a conjunction, meaning 'therefore' or 'since' :
    New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week, THEREFORE new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways. :cross: That is not the meaning of the whole sentence.
    New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week, SINCE new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways. :cross: This implies that all research/all inspiration leading to new discoveries occurs simply because there is a demand to apply ideas in practical ways.

    However, these days 'new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways' - a lot more so than in other ages.
    New scientific discoveries are being made every day of the week, BUT unlike in other ages when new ideas could be published, and then just sit in libraries as interesting theoretical knowledge , these days new ideas are quickly applied in practical ways.
     
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