MAGISTER IN PHILOSOPHIA IN STUDIIS DE RATIONIBUS UISQUE RERUM GERENDARUM

voltape

Senior Member
Peruvian Spanish/USA English
I have a diploma in Latin from the University of New Brunswick. The degree is
"MAGISTER IN PHILOSOPHIA IN STUDIIS DE RATIONIBUS UISQUE RERUM GERENDARUM" - I understand it is Master of Philosophy in ... I can't go any longer - seems it is Management and maybe accounting. I've used the Google translator (which for Latin it is not much reliable) and I got:
"TEACHER IN PHILOSOPHY IN THE STUDY ON REASONING AND CONTROL" Any help, please.
Thanks.
Note: it is written in stylized letters so I can't say whether it is UISQUE or VISQUE
 
  • voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Just a question; that "UISQUE" . what is it? it would seem it is VIS + QUE, meaning "and vis" . But "vis" is force. What is "force" doing there? Thank you again.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    I personally can't fathom what it's doing there, and discovering the meaning of the whole thing requires more divination powers than what I possess, though Scholiast's suggestion looks as probable as any. Literally it says "Master in philosophy in the study about ways/reasons, and of the power of conducting things" - except vīs has no genitive case in use, so this is a generous interpretation (as it's written, "the power" is the subject and is coordinated with "master").
     
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    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete de nouo!

    Yes, sorry that in my previous answer (# 2) I neglected this (UISQUE) puzzlesome bit. I suspect an error of transcription or perhaps printing. Could it conceivably have been URBISQUE, hence meaning "Accountancy and Civic Management"?

    Maybe voltape could supply a photo of the document? If so we might between us be able to shed more light on the matter.

    Σ
     

    voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    1643376492402.png

    Dear Scholiast: this is a copy of the Degree. The client says it is Master of Philosophy in Policy Studies. The Latin seems too long for such a short translation. Please, it's urgent.
    Thank you very much again.
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Oh, I have an idea: it's rationibus viisque "methods and ways". rerum doesn't specify that it's public policy (rerum publicarum) as opposed to business or private affairs, but I would believe a client who said that the former is meant. Written out in full it would have been even longer.
     

    voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    thank you, but it says VISQUE, not VIISQUE - could it be a typo in the Diploma? Would you advice me to accept it as "Policy Studies"? Thank you again.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Are there other examples of the reduction of viis to vis?
    Well, dīs = diīs (later = deīs) "to the gods" is the most common one from Plautus onwards; with other nouns the double ii spelling (and syllabification) was predominant classically, and one i is not commonly attested, but it happens, as well as the reverse - two ii for a single long /ī/. This phenomenon is rather antique (in the living language) than medieval or later.
    thank you, but it says VISQUE, not VIISQUE - could it be a typo in the Diploma? Would you advice me to accept it as "Policy Studies"? Thank you again.
    The only way it can be understood is as UIISQUE "and ways" - whether it's a typo or intended only the typist knows, but I'd say a typo. rationibus viisque (ratio viaque) is an established expression. "Policy Studies" seems the most likely intended meaning.
     
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    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Sobakus (# 8): brilliant suggestion. And despite the amiable bearded's misgivings (# 9), I am (though no expert in mediaeval Latin or its orthography, especially not in Gothic script), sure this looks to me convincing—although I cannot supply chapter and verse, I am sure I have seen this dat./abl. plural contraction elsewhere. Edit: cross-posted.

    Σ
     
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    voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Hallelujah! The client sent me his certificate in English and it is Policy Studies, so your deduction was correct. Thanks to you all! Diplomas in Latin of modern careers are bewildering.
     
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